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Viaggio nella scrittura di Enrico Palandri Annali d'Italianistica, Ilaria Masenga. Viaggio nella scrittura di Enrico Palandri. Achille Serrao and Luigi Bonaffini. Mineola, NY: Legas, The ninth volume in a series edited by Gaetano Cipolla of St. The Bread and the Rose is an ambitious tri-lingual work, covering five centuries of Neapolitan poetry chronologically and thematically with the original and the English translations facing each other on the same page and the Italian translation at the foot of the page.

The reader can therefore either enjoy the poems on the own merits or spend some pleasurable time navigating the three linguistic registers while reflecting on all sorts of philological, etymological and cultural intricacies. The volume also includes a bibliography and biographical notes. Each selection is presented with a brief page introduction that situates the work in its historical, cultural and linguistic context, often noting inspirations and influences across time. Here the critical apparatus notes and short list of references before each selection is invaluable.

The numerous Neapolitan publishers remind the readers that Naples was once and still is a city with a thriving editorial and publishing culture. Common themes throughout the centuries include love unrequited and fulfilled , lust and longing, and also nature, relationships, society, criminality, food, children and popular religion: in short, a prism through which we can come to understand Neapolitan culture over time.

State zitto! But the final section on neo-dialect poetry is in some way the most interesting. How do contemporary poets navigate the difficult waters and currents of tradition, nostalgia and influence? The idea and the book are a beautiful defense of dialect in an age of globalization and homogeneity. Stanislao G. New York: Italica Press, While Tronzo admits the discontinuity and disappearance of historical works from late antiquity, he is able to provide a structural explanation of Naples in the early Middle Ages. He also gives an account of the historical cathedral complex, including the nave, Santa Restituta, and its baptistery, San Giovanni in Fonte.

However, the tower of Santa Maria Maggiore now remains freestanding and it is one of the earliest of a series of medieval passage towers. The focus then shifts to the patronage of the pious confraternities, the Angevins, and the Churches of the Friars. In the s Naples became increasingly valued as a political and economic center, which stimulated urban projects and emphasized the importance of patronage from private donors. San Lorenzo has an extensive building history of reconstruction, delayed completions, and extensions that reflect the changes in Franciscan architecture throughout Italy.

While the history of San Domenico is much less extensive, it proves the importance of Tuscan artists in Naples. According to Bruzelius the War of the Sicilian Vespers in , the construction of the Castel Nuovo by Charles I in , and the transfer of the archive and mint to Naples all contributed to making it the capital of the kingdom of Naples. His first project was the reconstruction of the new cathedral in June , which played an important role in the capitalization of Naples. The final chapter by Bruzelius concludes with the Angevin reconfiguration of Naples.

There are very few remains from fourteenth-century Naples to attest to any sign of cultural vitality. Caroline Bruzelius and William Tronzo offer a very informative analysis of Neapolitan monuments and urbanism in the Middle Ages. They reveal their special expertise in and provide brilliant interpretations of the often ambiguous aspects of Neapolitan art and architecture. Their book is very concise and clear and serves as an excellent introduction to medieval Naples for a wide variety of general readers as well as scholars.

Viene dunque proposta come analisi innovativa quella che interroga i testi allo scopo di individuare nella proiezione letteraria della Roma allegorica il riflesso della rappresentazione del potere. Nella seconda parte del libro, la ricerca si concentra sullo studio della personificazione di Roma nel corso del XIV secolo. Mineola: Legas, Sweet Lemons 2, the second volume edited by Venera Fazio and Delia De Santis celebrating Sicilian culture, literature, immigrants, and writers, follows directly in the successful footsteps of the first anthology published in Nearly eighty other contributors, whose brief biographies can be found at the end of the book, join them.

Through analysis of trends in migration, Scambray arrives at the conclusion that the melting-pot culture of North America endangers the national identity that is so important to Sicilians. Concluding with an overview of some of the most recent and important culturally relevant works on, about, or remembering Sicily, Scambray closes suggesting that Sweet Lemons 2 is able to help define Sicilian ethnicity through its compilation of Sicilian poems, memoirs, and tales.

The introduction by co-editor and contributor Venera Fazio explains that, following the success of their first volume, she and co-editor Delia De Santis requested contributions from writers of Sicilian heritage from English-speaking countries including the United Kingdom, Ireland, Australia and New Zealand, in addition to North American countries.

The inclusion of personal memoirs, poems, short stories, and historically fictional fables helps readers to appreciate what it might mean to be Sicilian and the important differences between Sicilians and peninsular Italians. For those already familiar with Sicily and her offspring, this volume highlights some of the most beautiful memories, stories, and fables associated with her. Sulle tracce di Orfeo: storia di un mito.

Pisa, Edizioni ETS, Questi sono tutti aspetti positivi. Il terzo capitolo analizza Orfeo come simbolo che incarna la cultura degli albori del melodramma. New York: Bordighera Press, Reading the reviews in the order in which they are presented, one gets a sense of the wide-ranging and profoundly interdisciplinary nature of Italian American Studies. In addition to demonstrating the epic scope of available literature, provocative juxtapositions like those listed above highlight the existence of a vibrant and engaged community of scholars. The collection also underscores the political commitment of so many Italian American scholars and how studies in Italian American history and culture connect to larger questions of justice and equality.

Bookshelf Another important feature of the collection is its emphasis on the connection between Italy and Italian America. While the current structure of the book does allow for fruitful comparisons along its delightfully meandering path through a ten-year period of publications in Italian American Studies, an alternative might have been to organize the reviews thematically or chronologically, or at least to include indices listing the works by genre, discipline or year published.

Finally, there are enough typos to stumble over and the page numbers in the index are inaccurate in some cases. The book will be of interest to scholars of Italian American, American, and Italian Studies, as well as a wider public of informed citizens. It seems a particularly useful resource, as well, for university professors beginning to develop an Italian American Studies curriculum.

Studi sulla letteratura e le arti. Napoli: Liguori Editore, Nel poema Il poeta degli Iloti, egli rinuncia alla poesia cosmica ed epica per convertirsi alla musa del lavoro e delle umili cose ; in Un uomo di pensiero e un uomo di azione afferma che la poesia non comporta imitazione e sgorga dal turbamento dello spirito che rivela a se stessi ed agli altri cose ignote. Paolo Pacello, aversano nato nel , a latere del petrarchismo dominante, testimonia il liberalismo linguistico degli scrittori napoletani Il salernitano Vincenzo Braca compose farse cavaiole offensive nei riguardi dei Cavesi.

Italy and the Bourgeoisie. The Re-Thinking of a Class. The nine essays collected in the volume draw upon cultural and especially literary production in order to understand the ways in which artists and writers, often themselves formed in a bourgeois social environment, have represented the character, the mission and, increasingly, as we move down the decades, the shortcomings of this class from unification to the beginning of the twenty-first century.

In one of the strongest contributions, Cristina Della Coletta considers the bourgeoisie at its apogee in the second half of the nineteenth century. Giuseppe Tosi, writing on a series of memoirs that reflected upon the armistice of 8 September , also considers a sudden shift in self-perception: that of many bourgeois young men born under the Fascist regime and brought up to believe in its promises of national grandeur, who abruptly had to reorient their allegiances and expectations and as a result experienced a sense of anguished self-loathing.

Another historical trauma, that of terrorism, is the subject of three closely related essays by Cosetta Seno Reed, Giancarlo Lombardi and Gius Gargiulo. The instrumental logic that governs bourgeois relations makes both the capitalist fathers and the revolutionary children that putatively rise against them faces of the same coin. With the final two essays we come to the threshold of the twenty-first century. For Nicoletta Di Ciolla, the noir fiction of Gianni Farinetti, and in particular his first novel, Un delitto fatto in casa , paints a broad picture of an Italian and, specifically, Turinese upper bourgeois family in order to lay bare the hypocrisy and hollowness that governs both its private and public actions.

The contradictory father-daughter relationship staged by Mazzucati is the story of a failed transgression, as the protagonist remains in thrall of the bourgeois values internalized in childhood. The only flaw of the volume is that Farleigh Dickinson University Press seems to have spent little time on copy-editing the text. Otherwise, these essays, all characterized by theoretical rigor and fine textual analyses, are exemplary of the kind of contribution that an interdisciplinary approach — cutting across film, literary and cultural studies — can make to the renewal of Italian Studies.

Ann Goldstein. New York: Fordham University Press, Il testo si aggiunge agli studi e ai volumi dedicati alla letteratura italo-americana negli Stati Uniti, prendendo in esame testi ed autori che spaziano dal XIX sino a gran parte del XX secolo. Tra gli autori antologizzati si conta Riccardo Cordiferro, che compose poesie in italiano, ma anche in calabrese, siciliano e napoletano. Marazzi distingue tre fasi relative alla letteratura italo-americana dal fascismo ai nostri giorni: quella della tradizione, che attraversa tutto il periodo nonostante sia soprattutto presente sino alla fine della Seconda Guerra Mondiale tra gli autori della tradizione si contano, tra gli altri, Mario Soldati e Giuseppe Antonio Borgese ; quella della crisi o anche del silenzio, che abbraccia i primi tre decenni della repubblica italiana dalla sua istituzione nel tra gli autori di questa fase sono inclusi Mario Rigoni Stern, Gianluigi Melega, Angela Bianchini, Guido Morselli ed Ennio Flaiano ; infine quella del presente, che conta autori quali Andrea De Carlo, Pia Fontana, Luigi Settembrini, Sergio Campailla, Rossana Campo, Gina Lagorio, Lidia Ravera, Gianni Celati e Daniele Brolli.

The Muslims of Medieval Italy. Edinburgh: Edinburgh University Press, This work, by noted historian Alex Metcalfe, is a wonderful addition to the bibliography on the central Mediterranean. In a chronological reach that extends from the year to , Metcalfe charts the creation and eventual demise of Muslim society in Sicily and Southern Italy. Metcalfe examines the political and economic organization of the new Muslim holding, including the Islamicization and Arabicization of cities such as Palermo which became important centers of Islamic cultural and political life. Such tensions evolved into the civil wars that rocked the island between and Non-Muslims would pay both a land and a religious poll tax, or jizya, but would retain religious autonomy.

In the case of conversions, the jizya was remitted. According to Metcalfe, many communities retained their Christian faith, even while adopting Arabic culture and language. In this same chapter, Metcalfe also examines the relationship between Sicily and Ifriqiya, the old Roman province of Africa corresponding to present-day Libya, Tunisia, and Algeria, noting that the island, despite its origin as a colony, began to develop very complex and, at times, decidedly antagonistic relationships with the motherland.

It was during Fatimid- Kalbid rule that the town of Palermo reached its prime while the rural economy of the countryside was transformed by systems of irrigation and the introduction of new plants, such as citrus fruit, date palms, mulberry, sumac, sugar cane, and papyrus. According to Metcalfe, the most important product of Sicily was grain, traded with Ifriqiya for gold. Yet despite the flourishing of the island under Kalbid rule, from the mids a new civil war swept across Sicily.

This war, which is discussed by Metcalfe in his fourth chapter, was the result of internal dissent between the emirs who dominated Sicily, but was also aggravated by external aggressions on the part of the Byzantines and especially the Normans who landed on the island in the s, completing their conquest in It also did not originate from the north of Europe.

While the Normans who landed in Sicily hailed originally from Normandy, they were already well established in southern mainland Italy where they served as mercenaries of the Byzantines or as barons and knights titled by Papal investiture. Subsequent pages of this chapter focus on Robert Guiscard and his brother Roger de Hauteville, whose successful military campaigns were aided by tensions that were simmering among the emirs.

The Normans also adopted the Muslim system of tribute that permitted Christians and Jews to live on the island, with the Normans becoming the beneficiaries of the jizya that was now paid by Muslims and Jews. In the sixth chapter, Metcalfe focuses on additional strategies employed by the Normans to rule over a population of different faiths, ethnicities, cultures, and languages.

As a result of this process, many educated and wealthy Muslims left the island for Ifriqiya or Andalusia in what Metcalfe compares to a diaspora, whose consequence was the rapid decline of Arabic Islamic culture. Chapter seven further describes the increasingly peripheral role of Muslims in Sicily, forced to live in crown lands or Latin church holdings. In these pages, Metcalfe devotes much attention to George of Antioch, a central figure in the administration of the island under Roger II. Metcalfe also devotes some pages to describe the tense relations between the Normans and the papacy, leading to treaty of Benevento whereby the king limited the presence of papal legates on the island.

In chapter nine and ten , Metcalfe surveys the period between the s and s, when many massacres of Muslims took place. Initially limited to the killing of eunuchs who held high administrative positions, the violence quickly spread to Palermo and Messina, where in the s even ordinary Muslim homes were looted. The eleventh chapter further examines the plight of Muslim minorities whose promotion and social mobility were increasingly tied to conversion to Christianity. This said, Metcalfe clearly acknowledges the importance of the kingdom in the transmission of Arabic-Greek and Greek-Latin culture and devotes his thirteenth chapter to a discussion of Norman patronage, especially in the translation of philosophical and scientific texts.

This intellectual exchange is noteworthy but Metcalfe again points out that the translations were primarily from Arabic or Greek into Latin, thus indicating an orientation towards a language, and by implication, a Western culture, of growing hegemony. The chapter traces the succession crisis that befell the kingdom after the death of William II in , leading to the Staufen dynasty of Henry VI of Germany and his son Frederick, both German emperor and king of Sicily. While he patronized Muslim art and science, his court did not promote Muslim subjects to any high administrative positions.

At the same time, however, he accelerated the process towards a wide adoption of Latin Christianity by pushing Muslims to accept the concessions made by his predecessor William to the Bishop of Monreale. His behavior fomented more Muslim revolts, which he promptly crushed before deporting all his remaining Muslim subjects to a single location on the mainland: the colony of Lucera.

This mass deportation, which occurred at the beginning of the thirteenth century, severely impacted Western Sicily, where a sophisticated system of irrigation put in place by the Muslims had enabled a highly diversified production of crops. With the departure of the Muslims, a monoculture of tenant farmers took hold, whose repercussions on Sicilian economy would be felt for centuries to come.

By , the demise of the Muslims was sealed: they were sold into slavery and even conversion did not secure their future in the peninsula. The Chronicle of Le Murate. Saundra Weddle. Toronto: Center for Reformation and Renaissance Studies, This book presents an interesting document disclosing the life of the Benedictine convent of Santissima Annunziata delle Murate, commonly referred to as Le Murate. Among the many religious communities spread throughout Renaissance Florence by the population of nuns in the city had reached 2, , Le Murate was an institution of crucial importance, because of its strong bonds with the most prominent families of the time.

It includes a detailed description of the day-to-day activities of the nuns, as well as their participation in the life of the city. Beyond the enjoyment of Renaissance art, the convent of Le Murate was tightly connected with well-known citizens and institutions. This Chronicle casts light on a religious institution that had a secular import and a major impact in the life of Florentine women of the time. The convent functioned as an essential component of the support network for lay women who, after having received part of their education inside the convent, kept a close relationship with the nuns even once they left the convent walls.

The material of the chronicle is divided into 78 chapters and arranged chronologically. As Weddle reminds us in her introduction, Sister Giustina abided by the intrinsic humility dictated by her habit and rule and was not concerned with the notion of individual authorship. The chapters reveal facts that vary in nature and are often transfigured into signs of the divine plan to which the nuns of Le Murate were strenuously struggling to conform. Giustina deals as well with practical matters such as construction at the convent, an issue arising rather frequently given the growing population of nuns and, at times, of lay women in need of assistance.

Moreover, it provides an example of an enclosed community that was not detached from the secular life of the surrounding city, and, further, that was able to give the women it enclosed the power of decision-making, a benefit that lay women seldom had in those times. Marina Cocuzza and Lorna Watson. The first major issue is consistency, which the text lacks entirely. To begin with, the editors anglicize names in certain tales but retain Italo-Sicilian names in others.

The illustrations by Roberto Moscato, which lack captions and vary greatly in scan quality, sometimes appear only on the Sicilian side of the text 32 , but at other times are needlessly duplicated on both sides ; Beyond its inconsistencies, the translation suffers from many other substantive issues.

Technically, it is full of errors, including abundant botched punctuation. Enraged characters mellow when exclamation points disappear in translation. The most serious problem facing The King of Love and Other Tales is that its intended audience is unclear; it is impossible to say whether the translators have done their work with schoolchildren or scholars in mind.

Several examples highlight this fundamental incoherency. Conversely, other choices suggest that the book is meant for an academic readership. These footnotes, frequently superfluous, provide a visual cue that the tales are to be analyzed first, enjoyed later. This begs the question whether the intended reader knows Italian. If so, why bother with an English translation at all? The overall effect is that the work reads like two books cobbled together, with little correspondence between the Sicilian and English sections.

Jonathan R. New Perspectives on the European Bildungsroman. London: Continuum In New Perspectives on the European Bildungsroman, a remarkable study about an intriguing literary genre, Giovanna Summerfield and Lisa Downward explore both traditional and nontraditional European novels that fall into this category. Typically, the protagonist, whose development is narrated in the third person, is a male belonging to the bourgeoisie. Spirituality is the focus of part one of this study, in which Summerfield discusses bildungsroman by European male authors.

In part two, Downward shifts the focus to gender, which complicates the conventional concepts of this genre. Summerfield points out that Italians were the last to adopt the Masonic philosophy, which was embraced by the secret society, la Carboneria. Summerfield adds Ugo Foscolo to this circle. It is, however, precisely in their common female condition that Downward finds elements of bildung.

For example, maternity brings salvation. Downward concludes with Jane Eyre, whose ending is somewhat similar to that of Teresa. Unlike Aleramo, Tamaro and Woolf represent the mother- daughter relationship in a non-linear way. The authors conclude that the bildungsroman as a genre continues to flourish in multi-cultural settings. Undoubtedly, many types of scholars will treasure New Perspectives on the European Bildungsroman, in which Summerfield and Downward have indeed widened the horizons of this classical genre.

VI — XIV. Fregene Roma , Edizioni Spolia Electronic Book. Secondo Procopio, la politica giustinianea tese a scardinare sul nascere la pacifica coesistenza tra barbari e latini. Bookshelf La Cronografia di Teofane fu proseguita, nel X secolo, da vari autori di cui si conserva un corpus noto come Teofane Continuato di intento propagandistico a favore della dinastia macedone che, con Basilio I , riprese la politica aggressiva in Occidente. Looters, Photographers, and Thieves. The remainder of the introduction outlines the organization of the book into seven chapters, two of which are devoted to the image of the body and a reflection on the visual discourse present in selected works of Italian literature.

The chapter continues the discussion on bodies by examining self- portraiture as a genre within photography that positions the self in a public and discursive context. He then proceeds to examine how concerns with the relationship between image and word traverse works by Italo Calvino, Leonardo Sciascia, and Gianni Celati. For Sciascia as for the French critic, photography leads to a crisis of identity as the body that is photographed ushers in a dissociation of the self.

Moving on to Celati, Verdicchio contends that he is one of the most visually interesting authors, as evidenced by his understanding of writing as a visual process and his long collaboration with the photographer Luigi Ghirri and other visual artists, including several filmmakers. While this chapter is full of interesting observations, the topic is probably too broad to be analyzed in a single section of a book.

The remaining chapters are devoted to the work of photographers. Yet, adds Verdicchio, not all early photography served the nationalist agenda. Such concerns, however, were not present in the post- unification war against brigantaggio where photographs of brigands and bandits, often shown through graphic images of decapitated and mutilated bodies, functioned as warnings against the resistance and uprisings of the South.

By so doing, Verga questions nationalist agendas inasmuch as he levels hierarchies between social classes while foregrounding the visual presence of a subaltern group that cannot be erased by the dominant one. While Verdicchio acknowledges the socially minded work of both men, he also notes that their images flattened all ethnic and cultural distinction, turning migrants into faceless others and depriving them of agency and specificity in the new nation.

In it, Modotti wears a Tehuantepec costume, which Verdicchio interprets as an expression of the self as other. The book closes with a short autobiographical chapter where Verdicchio presents a photograph of his family and friends on the day of their departure from Naples for Canada. Belabored bodies on which are inscribed socio-economic constraints tied to emigration, they remain out of focus. Yet, in the imperfection of this shot, Verdicchio locates the transition from one national reality to another: the uncertainty of emigration as well as the expression of a potential still to be achieved in the New World.

Toronto: University of Toronto Press, The result is the most comprehensive analysis of the six tenzone sonnets within the larger Italian literary tradition to date.

I prossimi eventi

Arguing for the moral function of literary derision, Alfie grounds his readings of the tenzone within thirteenth-century debates over the nature, value and legitimacy of the Florentine nobility. Leeds: Northern Universities Press, — namely, that of distinguishing between the seemingly autobiographical claims made by jocose poets and their comic masks — Alfie plunders the Alighieri and Donati family histories to throw light upon the highly personal sequence of ad hominem attacks. The focus instead remains squarely on the tenzoni themselves, on their literary precursors and influence, and on their clear appurtenance to a robust yet currently understudied rhetorical tradition.

Citations from Brunetto Latini and others provide the theoretical framework debate poetry as forum for public reproach and correction. A working lexicon of vituperative motifs is then gleaned from close readings of three sonnets by the Florentine caposcuola of derisive verse, Rustico Filippi ca. Alfie flexes his philological muscles in the next chapter, where all six of the tenzoni between Dante and Forese come under close scrutiny.

A formal analysis of each poem is set against a wealth of socio-historical material relating to, for example, familial alliances, mercantile jargon and even female physiognomy. It is within this narrow context that Alfie clarifies that while the picture of conjugal love presented in Purgatorio 23 may in fact constitute a repudiation of his earlier denigration of Nella, it by no means indicates a rejection of the poetics improperium as a whole. A brief conclusion is followed by an appendix containing manuscript transcriptions of the sonnets and analysis of the sources.

Fabian Alfie is to be commended, first and foremost, for having made literal sense of the notoriously cryptic exchange. His paraphrases, translations and glosses render the almost incomprehensible series of interpersonal attacks intelligible to a modern audience. His novel interpretations are thought- provoking and, while certainly plausible, not always beyond debate. Still, praise for the content and scope of this volume far outweighs any blame for minor stylistic imperfections. Sara E. Tempo liturgico e tempo storico nella Commedia di Dante.

Vatican City: Libreria Editrice Vaticana, Rather, Ardissino is interested in liturgy as a synonym for community and also for justice. Chapter 3 moves on to Purgatorio, where liturgical hymns and penitential rites are of course foregrounded. Focusing on the episode in the valley of the princes, Ardissino puts forward the thesis that their negligence that keeps them waiting outside the gate is of the state, not of religion His sin becomes an abandonment of Beatrice in his poems for other women and in his foray into philosophical prose.

After a sort of contrition and baptism, he is back on track to be the poet of Beatrice. In Chapter 6, Ardissino concentrates on the heaven of the wise men, where music is used as the representation of concord. In chapter 7, in keeping with her central concern with the theme of justice, she concentrates on the eagle in the heaven of Jupiter. The final chapter focuses on the celestial rose described in Paradiso 31, where she contrasts, as Dante does, the dysfunctional city of the flower Florence with the ideal community of the celestial rose of saints.

This is liturgical in so far as liturgy presupposes community. The pageants in Eden are modeled both on Roman triumphs and on liturgical processions. This is certainly true of most references in this poem, liturgical or not. Cachey, eds. Devers Program in Dante Studies Il volume si basa su una serie di seminari organizzati dal William and Katherine Devers Program in Dante Studies per il settimo centenario della nascita di Francesco Petrarca. I primi tre interventi che aprono il libro insistono nel presentare l'immagine di un Petrarca che in maniera consapevole e premeditata cerca di cancellare i debiti che lo legano al grande poeta che lo ha preceduto, Dante Alighieri, proprio nel momento in cui sviluppa una poetica che si oppone in maniera sostanziale al dantismo.

Theodore J. Secondo Cachey Petrarca arriverebbe a sostenere che Dante era un falso profeta e che non era un poeta Albert R. Teodolinda Barolini nel suo intervento si concentra sulla natura metafisica della poesia petrachesca, non in quanto soluzione filosofica, ma come risposta pratica ai problemi posti dalla natura temporale della voce poetica sottolineata da Petrarca.

Le preoccupazioni metafisiche di Petrarca emergerebbero soprattutto nelle prime poesie del Canzoniere , e lo porterebbero a ridimensionare notevolmente la materia erotica in favore di una meditazione sulla subordinazione dell'io poetico alla dimensione temporale e molteplice della vita. Come suggeriscono gli stessi curatori, il rapporto tra Dante e Petrarca andrebbe approfondito ulteriormente includendo nel confronto Boccaccio.

Su questo piano appare necessario un approfondimento capace di ricostruire la posizione di Dante e Petrarca nel contesto delle grandi discussioni teologiche e filosofiche del Trecento. A New Life of Dante. Revised and updated edition. Exeter: University of Exeter Press, Nel riproporre, a quasi dieci anni di distanza dalla prima edizione, la sua fortunata biografia di Dante, Bemrose non ha apportato sostanziali modifiche al suo lavoro.

The Places

Il lavoro parte dalla premessa, condivisibile, che negli ultimi dieci anni non sono emersi documenti tali da rivoluzionare la biografia dantesca xi. Cangrande della Scala, Guido da Polenta, Moroello Malaspina, Guido da Batifolle, Margherita di Brabante, del resto, compaiono puntualmente nella biografia di Bemrose, ma chi fossero questi individui, quali fossero le loro idee politiche e, in particolare, quale fosse la natura dei loro rapporti con Dante sono questioni cui forse poteva essere rivolta una qualche attenzione.

Per concludere, quindi, il volume di Bemrose risulta una pregevole e stimolante introduzione alle opere di Dante, cui forse avrebbe giovato un aggiornamento critico e storiografico. A cura di Roberta Morosini, con la collaborazione di Andrea Cantile. Firenze: Mauro Pagliai Editore, Il volume rappresenta quindi nella sua interezza un notevole elemento di stimolo e di apertura verso un approfondimento indagativo pluridirezionale, vista la ricchezza di elementi e di dati interpretativi forniti.

Each bite is delightful and the service is smooth, moving from one dish to another so easily that any inconsistency is hardly noticeable. The offerings are varied and wide-ranging, but not exhaustive. However, the Fiordespina-Bradamante incident is central to Hopeless Love mostly in an organizational sense, linking works that precede the two romance epics with works that follow them. The first chapter explores the antecedents of Bradamante, the object of queer female desire in both the Innamorato and the Furioso. DeCoste does not elaborate, however, and thus misses the opportunity to make a thematic connection: these contrary attitudes towards female autonomy and eros are typical of the two authors, and remain consistent in their characterizations of Bradamante and Fiordespina, as well as in their depiction of queer female desire.

These situations are resolved in an Ovidian mode when the fictive male is transformed, through divine intervention, into an authentic man. The brief section on female hagiography that ends the chapter is helpful in establishing cross-dressing and queer female desire as motifs, but seems otherwise extraneous. This expectation enables Boiardo to imply completion of his tale even while interrupting it; he also utilizes hopeless love to represent the manifold crises — narrative, historical, personal — facing him when he stopped writing his poem.

Indeed, Orlando furioso consistently contains and punishes female desire, whereas Orlando innamorato consistently affirms it. One might almost say that for Boiardo, no female desire is queer, and for Ariosto, all female desire is queer, unless it is represents a response or a submission to male desire. If anything, the comedies appear to be in dialogue with the cantari, with which they share conventional endings. Hopeless Love is necessary reading for anyone interested in the kaleidoscope of sexuality present in Italian Renaissance literature. Paris: Presses Sorbonne Nouvelle, The eleven articles that constitute the collection are organized chronologically.

Some are in Italian, others in French. Italian sources are included in the original language with accompanying French translations where applicable. These individual studies follow an august introductory essay by Anna Fontes Baratto who provides an overview of major classical and medieval authors on amicitia, as well as their contribution to the tradition of related literature and to studies comprising the collection.

Essay titles will be abbreviated in this review. Articles range from historical to literary analyses, with a number of texts constituting interdisciplinary studies that span both categories. Various types of friends and friendships are considered: good and bad, real and ideal, private and public, secular and religious, present and absent, social and political, homogeneous and heterogeneous. It is not only ideals and practices of friendship that are considered, but also the relationship between friendship and writing epistolary and poetic , and friendship through writing.

Five studies analyze actual historical friendships as reflected in personal correspondence, with three focusing on consolation and counselling in material or spiritual matters, one considering friendship among men of unequal stature, and another discussing friendship at a distance as a spiritual phenomenon. Bookshelf The remaining two of these studies turn to important literary figures: Dante and Petrarch. Fictional or literary friendships also constitute an important focus of the collection.

In addition to specific literary friendships, the topic of friendship in literary texts is a third unifying theme of the collection. The classical sources of medieval Italian conceptions of friendship and the ends to which they were appropriated are duly highlighted in this comprehensive study on amity as an idea and as a reality in Italy of the Middle Ages: friendship as lived, theorized, and penned.

A Bilingual Edition. Troy Tower and Jane Tylus. Jane Tylus. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, King and Albert Rabil Jr, which also includes the recent publication of the works of Lucrezia Marinella and Chiara Matraini, among other female writers. The importance of this volume resides in several aspects. First, it is the only modern edition to restore the original order of the poems that appeared in the edition prepared by Cassandra Stampa after the death of her sister Gaspara. The poems are grouped by genre in three sections: sonnets, capitoli tercets of hendecasyllables linked by concatenation , and madrigals.

Second, this edition proposes to reproduce the original Renaissance text with its inconsistencies in elisions, spelling, capitalizations, and diacritics; discrepancies among subsequent editions are signalled in the notes to the text grouped at the end of the volume. Selected Poems, New York: Italica, , which presents a limited critical apparatus. She first gives some biographical information, engaging with preceding critical interpretations i. Next, she addresses the poetic influences on Stampa starting with Petrarch, but including also Sappho, Ovid, Horace, Propertius, Tibullus, Catullus, as well as some of her male and female contemporary writers.

All of these essays are lucid and informative, a perfect starting point for undergraduate and graduate study alike, especially given the useful select bibliography that follows and complements them. Also, at the very end of the volume, the editors have inserted three Appendixes. Tylus at times modifies the internal ordering of words and the sequence of lines for the benefit of the rhythm, but this technique does not work to the detriment of the original meaning.

One problem the reader not proficient in early modern Italian might face is that of understanding when the translation drifts apart from the original and becomes more interpretative than literal. If Tylus on occasion expresses concerns about translation in the notes, this is not always the case in the volume as a whole. A larger number of footnotes to the Italian text could have helped in disentangling some syntactic and semantic complexities which otherwise remain obscure.

If, on one hand, this translation aims to function intrinsically as a commentary on the original, therefore reducing the need for the multiplicity of notes the Italian reader is accustomed to in traditional Italian critical editions, on the other hand the reader now and then is left with some lingering textual concerns. Also, it might have been helpful to include line numbering for the poems. Della Repubblica fiorentina. Roma: Aracne, Mandricardo e la melanconia. Bruxelles: Peter Lang, Giudicetti dispiega uno sguardo focalizzato sulle due questioni — alle quali sono dedicati grosso modo le due parti che compongono il libro — avendo cura di farle convergere fino al loro contatto, momento in cui si raccolgono tutte le suggestioni accumulatesi nelle pagine.

A questo scopo, viene premessa una breve rassegna critica della bibliografia ariostesca, suddivisa per temi rilevanti, in modo da chiarire le connessioni con i lavori degli studiosi che lo hanno preceduto. Il motivo ispiratore e la lente attraverso cui guardare alle ottave ariostesche sono sempre chiari, e sono i momenti in cui la parola si organizza e assume determinate caratteristiche Il desiderio di stringere una soluzione, per quanto opinabile e passeggera si voglia, rimane.

Alcune parti non mancano di convincere, e offrono un punto di vista interessante sui meccanismi della parola nel poema, come nel caso di Rinaldo nel secondo capitolo della seconda parte. Metamorphosing Dante is the second volume in the series Cultural Inquiry, a project directed by Christoph F. The more specific focus and achievement of this volume is that it draws theoretical models of tension from Dante that support and give meaning to tensions found in contemporary literary thought and its expression.

In the Introduction, Camilletti, Gragnolati and Lampart pay special attention to the contextualization and definition of the term metamorphosis as a profoundly comprehensive and multifaceted notion. The book is divided into four sections. Among the successes of this volume beyond the vast identification and thoughtful analyses of appropriations of Dante in contemporary literature is the discovery and re-appropriation of the notion of tension itself as a positive, rather than as a negative term.

Each of the tensions identified in the various essays marks a locus of fecund ground, where literary exploration and innovation happen. Overall, this volume succeeds in demonstrating through its nineteen unique analyses that the act of metamorphosing Dante is a widespread twentieth- and twenty-first-century literary and artistic phenomenon, worthy of our attention not only as proof that understanding the past notwithstanding its medieval-ness can help provide a positive foundation for the present, but also as evidence that discovering fruit in spaces of tension has historical legitimacy.

Building a Monument to Dante: Boccaccio as Dantista. In chapter two, Boccaccio the biographer is examined as a force that shapes a figure of Dante that supported his own position in contemporary political and intellectual debates. In the third chapter, Houston delves into two lesser known works of Boccaccio in order to support his proposal of Boccaccio the apologist. Boccaccio, whose diverse literary pursuits made him too complex to fit in traditional medieval editing categories, broke the mould with his much more emancipated relationship as editor to the author.

Ever acting as a mediator of his two dominant masters, Boccaccio upheld Dante as an icon and an authoritative counterpoint to the philosophy of Petrarch. In the biographical Trattatello in laude di Dante, Houston finds that Boccaccio combines the various contemporary forms of biography to figure Dante as a man ordained by divine providence to instruct through his poetry.

These advocates generally rely on the justification that Boccaccio must have undergone a radical spiritual and moral conversion in the early s. In order to make the text accessible and meaningful to the popolani, Boccaccio keeps his Esposizioni relatively tangible with his vision of poetry as fundamentally political and ethical. In order to harmonize his reading of Dante among humanists and critics of vernacular literature, he downplays the specifically Christian allegory and interprets the Commedia as a secular text.

According to Houston, Boccaccio wrote at the helm of all new literary constructions that translated wisdom, whether pagan, Christian, vernacular, or Latin, to leaders of his day who could benefit from its moral lessons. Nonetheless, Houston pertinently reminds the reader that, despite these differences, throughout his lifelong monument-building process on behalf of Dante, Boccaccio always kept Petrarch in mind, and never abandoned the hope of harmonizing his two masters.

As a result, not only Boccaccio scholarship but also students and scholars of the literary environment of the tre corone will benefit greatly from this book. Dante in Oxford. The Paget Toynbee Lectures. Nine lectures delivered between and are presented in this collection of the Paget Toynbee Lectures; four of these are here published for the first time.

Regarding textual changes introduced by De Robertis, Leonardi points out sentences with a modern syntax and, vice-versa, syntagms whose meanings have precedents in Duecento poetry. He also discusses choices relating to three enduring debates. He dwells on sources such as Boethius, pseudo-Seneca, Ovid, Juvenal, Lucan, at times mediated by Brunetto or Boethius himself, through whom Dante renewed the concepts of nobility and generosity , This essay briefly outlines the initial diffusion of the poem with bibliography updated to to concentrate on metaphors variously elaborated by Dante, each time enriching them to complete their meaning.

Distancing himself from Charles S. The use of important editions such as Brunetto Tresor, edited by P. Beltami et al. Some inaccuracies also occur in the index of names. The book offers an overview of on contemporary Dante Studies from various countries, and it thus shows how different approaches, from Italy and from the Anglo-Saxon scholarship, can exchange results.

Disreputable Bodies gives a refreshing perspective on these philosophical discourses. Simultaneously, however, matter is the active force behind the ever-changing couplings of the elements. Matter is akin to the sexually aroused woman who continually couples with a fervent desire. These thinkers arrive at such symbols not based on Aristotle alone, but on the interventions of other thinkers and traditions. The Neoplatonic tradition, Plotinus, Maimonides, and Thomas Aquinas are but some of the influences Kodera recognizes in postulating the association between matter and a sexually desirous woman or prostitute.

Isola dei Famosi 2017: cosa è successo minuto per minuto nella finale di mercoledì 12 aprile

He establishes two parallel and at times complementary lines of investigation that are evident in this first chapter and continue throughout the book: gendered metaphors and deliberate misreadings of ancient sources. In the Neoplatonic context, Kodera examines the many female and overwhelmingly negative associations Ficino makes with matter.

Matter is the mirror image that ensnared Narcissus the soul and pulled him down to destruction ; matter is the female womb that traps and imprisons the soul, and, through the mirror influence of the liver, can receive alien imagery that changes the foetus. How does Kodera arrive at these bold assertions and expose the implicit meaning of these metaphors? Such misreading is at times the result of Renaissance thinkers tempering their Peripatetic or Platonic philosophies with the interventions of other authors such as the Rabbinic tradition in the Neoplatonic works of Leone Ebreo , or even new technologies distillation, primitive forms of plastic surgery that offer more dimensions to an already existing metaphor.

In other instances, the Renaissance philosophers deliberately ignore or misconstrue passages from Platonic texts that are contrary to their personal philosophy. Disreputable Bodies gives thought-provoking perspectives on long-studied philosophical discourses. It is not by accident that Kodera begins most chapters with citations from Shakespeare that make use of the very metaphors and abstract concepts under review in the chapter, demonstrating that by explicating these metaphors in their philosophical context, Renaissance scholars will be able to elucidate further other lingering quandaries in an assortment of literary texts.

In many ways the African American reception of Dante follows the trends in reading Dante over the centuries, but Looney focuses on what makes the African American reception of Dante unique; namely, the suggestion that Dante is a kind of abolitionist and the Divine Comedy a kind of slave narrative. The second half of the introduction tells of the surprising presence of Dante in a wax museum in Cincinnati created by Francis Trollope in First, Looney briefly considers the debate between W.

Du Bois and Booker T. Washington at the turn of the century over appropriate models of education for African Americans. At the heart of the chapter is a discussion of the imitation of the Inferno in the film Go Down, Death! While Williams uses Dante as a signifier of integration, Wright uses the Comedy to mark migration, and Ellison, as Looney explains in the concluding analysis of this chapter, employs Dante both to migrate into and to integrate his work with the European canon.

During the Black Revolution, Dante continued to be seen as a powerful model of activism and emancipation as evidenced by the early work of Baraka LeRoi Jones , who employs Dante in his expression of a new kind of militant black identity. Looney argues that, unlike Ellison and Wright who see Dante as a gateway into European culture, Baraka uses Dante first to measure the growing distance between himself and European literature, and subsequently to separate himself from it completely.

Loftis, Dudley Randall, Askia M. In terms of academic significance, Freedom Readers fills a gap in the reception of Dante in America. The chronology of African American Dante reception examined has been almost completely ignored by Dante scholars, as well as by Americanists and African Americanists. The literary imitations inspired by Dante which are examined in this book are not only useful for furthering an understanding of African American culture, but also for revealing unforeseen features of the Divine Comedy. Il primo capitolo riguarda la linguistica.

Stazio assurge a esempio paradigmatico del rapporto ambiguo — e si potrebbe aggiungere poietico —col testo virgiliano. Dante seguirebbe qui la stessa metodologia agostiniana, nella rilettura di testi classici in un nuovo sistema di significati. Si tratta di Catone, Dido ed Enea. Marchesi non solo adotta un approccio costruttivista nella sua speculazione, ma lo attribuisce allo stesso Dante, quale autore e teorizzatore del linguaggio poetico.

Riferendosi al capitolo 24 del Purgatorio, Dante mostrerebbe attraverso Stazio la differenza tra una corretta lettura costruttivista e una, inappropriata, di stampo oggettivista. Questo limite emerge soprattutto a proposito della tesi secondo cui Dante si appropria della lettura riservata al testo sacro per applicarla al suo capolavoro. Patrologia Graeca 53, Ravenna: Longo, Imprenscindibile in questo contesto il ruolo svolto da edizioni e traduzioni, che reintroducono nel circuito intellettuale opere di difficile accesso e talora assai rare. Negli altri due saggi, Elizabeth Fiedler discute il contesto religioso e iconografico del lavoro di Marinella, mentre Ryan Gogol si sofferma sul rapporto letterario tra la scrittrice e Cristofano Bronzini.

Una, Margherita Sarrocchi, sembra essere stata un punto di riferimento per Marinella, con la sua Scanderbeide e Sin dal primo canto il lettore familiarizza con i toni elevati e le immagini potenti, come nel caso della descrizione della flotta veneziana I, 30 sgg. Risulta insomma fondamentale ritornare in possesso di, e avere a disposizione, questo tassello del mosaico epico italiano e della letteratura seicentesca.

Pare si dilettasse di poesia epica anche Giovan Battista Marino. Fra i molti su questo argomento che furono scritti nel Seicento si veda quello sulla translatio della Santa Casa di Loreto dalla Palestina ai colli lauretani: Il tempio peregrino, poema sacroeroico di Giulio Acquaticci, recentemente edito a cura di Dino S. Cervigni, Roma, Aracne, , pp.

Come questa meritoria edizione riconferma. The Controversy of Renaissance Art. I rarely come across studies that truly debunk long-established assumptions about their own field of research. In The Controversy of Renaissance Art, Alexander Nagel meditates on Renaissance scholarship, on theoretical assumptions that have been — perhaps — too often taken for granted, and argues for a new interpretation of the artistic works of this period. It is well before those years, in fact, that the connections between sacred iconography and lay painting were subject to a profound scrutiny on the part of many Italian painters, who found new ways of depicting lay themes by reworking, reinterpreting sacred images.

From sacred iconography to the role of art itself, whether instrumental to the delight of private individuals or to form a collective conscience, virtually everything is scrutinized. He argues for the need to look at the research of religious historians to understand artistic texts in an utterly different way. This is a part of the Renaissance less studied and less taken for granted, particularly in Southern Europe — Italy, that is.

The first chapter explores the antecedents of Bradamante, the object of queer female desire in both the Innamorato and the Furioso. DeCoste does not elaborate, however, and thus misses the opportunity to make a thematic connection: these contrary attitudes towards female autonomy and eros are typical of the two authors, and remain consistent in their characterizations of Bradamante and Fiordespina, as well as in their depiction of queer female desire.

These situations are resolved in an Ovidian mode when the fictive male is transformed, through divine intervention, into an authentic man. The brief section on female hagiography that ends the chapter is helpful in establishing cross-dressing and queer female desire as motifs, but seems otherwise extraneous. This expectation enables Boiardo to imply completion of his tale even while interrupting it; he also utilizes hopeless love to represent the manifold crises — narrative, historical, personal — facing him when he stopped writing his poem.

Indeed, Orlando furioso consistently contains and punishes female desire, whereas Orlando innamorato consistently affirms it. One might almost say that for Boiardo, no female desire is queer, and for Ariosto, all female desire is queer, unless it is represents a response or a submission to male desire. If anything, the comedies appear to be in dialogue with the cantari, with which they share conventional endings.

Hopeless Love is necessary reading for anyone interested in the kaleidoscope of sexuality present in Italian Renaissance literature. Paris: Presses Sorbonne Nouvelle, The eleven articles that constitute the collection are organized chronologically. Some are in Italian, others in French. Italian sources are included in the original language with accompanying French translations where applicable. These individual studies follow an august introductory essay by Anna Fontes Baratto who provides an overview of major classical and medieval authors on amicitia, as well as their contribution to the tradition of related literature and to studies comprising the collection.

Essay titles will be abbreviated in this review. Articles range from historical to literary analyses, with a number of texts constituting interdisciplinary studies that span both categories. Various types of friends and friendships are considered: good and bad, real and ideal, private and public, secular and religious, present and absent, social and political, homogeneous and heterogeneous.

It is not only ideals and practices of friendship that are considered, but also the relationship between friendship and writing epistolary and poetic , and friendship through writing. Five studies analyze actual historical friendships as reflected in personal correspondence, with three focusing on consolation and counselling in material or spiritual matters, one considering friendship among men of unequal stature, and another discussing friendship at a distance as a spiritual phenomenon. Bookshelf The remaining two of these studies turn to important literary figures: Dante and Petrarch.

Fictional or literary friendships also constitute an important focus of the collection. In addition to specific literary friendships, the topic of friendship in literary texts is a third unifying theme of the collection. The classical sources of medieval Italian conceptions of friendship and the ends to which they were appropriated are duly highlighted in this comprehensive study on amity as an idea and as a reality in Italy of the Middle Ages: friendship as lived, theorized, and penned.

A Bilingual Edition. Troy Tower and Jane Tylus. Jane Tylus. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, King and Albert Rabil Jr, which also includes the recent publication of the works of Lucrezia Marinella and Chiara Matraini, among other female writers. The importance of this volume resides in several aspects.

First, it is the only modern edition to restore the original order of the poems that appeared in the edition prepared by Cassandra Stampa after the death of her sister Gaspara. The poems are grouped by genre in three sections: sonnets, capitoli tercets of hendecasyllables linked by concatenation , and madrigals.

Second, this edition proposes to reproduce the original Renaissance text with its inconsistencies in elisions, spelling, capitalizations, and diacritics; discrepancies among subsequent editions are signalled in the notes to the text grouped at the end of the volume. Selected Poems, New York: Italica, , which presents a limited critical apparatus. She first gives some biographical information, engaging with preceding critical interpretations i. Next, she addresses the poetic influences on Stampa starting with Petrarch, but including also Sappho, Ovid, Horace, Propertius, Tibullus, Catullus, as well as some of her male and female contemporary writers.

All of these essays are lucid and informative, a perfect starting point for undergraduate and graduate study alike, especially given the useful select bibliography that follows and complements them. Also, at the very end of the volume, the editors have inserted three Appendixes. Tylus at times modifies the internal ordering of words and the sequence of lines for the benefit of the rhythm, but this technique does not work to the detriment of the original meaning. One problem the reader not proficient in early modern Italian might face is that of understanding when the translation drifts apart from the original and becomes more interpretative than literal.

If Tylus on occasion expresses concerns about translation in the notes, this is not always the case in the volume as a whole. A larger number of footnotes to the Italian text could have helped in disentangling some syntactic and semantic complexities which otherwise remain obscure. If, on one hand, this translation aims to function intrinsically as a commentary on the original, therefore reducing the need for the multiplicity of notes the Italian reader is accustomed to in traditional Italian critical editions, on the other hand the reader now and then is left with some lingering textual concerns.

Also, it might have been helpful to include line numbering for the poems. Della Repubblica fiorentina. Roma: Aracne, Mandricardo e la melanconia. Bruxelles: Peter Lang, Giudicetti dispiega uno sguardo focalizzato sulle due questioni — alle quali sono dedicati grosso modo le due parti che compongono il libro — avendo cura di farle convergere fino al loro contatto, momento in cui si raccolgono tutte le suggestioni accumulatesi nelle pagine.

A questo scopo, viene premessa una breve rassegna critica della bibliografia ariostesca, suddivisa per temi rilevanti, in modo da chiarire le connessioni con i lavori degli studiosi che lo hanno preceduto. Il motivo ispiratore e la lente attraverso cui guardare alle ottave ariostesche sono sempre chiari, e sono i momenti in cui la parola si organizza e assume determinate caratteristiche Il desiderio di stringere una soluzione, per quanto opinabile e passeggera si voglia, rimane.

Alcune parti non mancano di convincere, e offrono un punto di vista interessante sui meccanismi della parola nel poema, come nel caso di Rinaldo nel secondo capitolo della seconda parte. Metamorphosing Dante is the second volume in the series Cultural Inquiry, a project directed by Christoph F. The more specific focus and achievement of this volume is that it draws theoretical models of tension from Dante that support and give meaning to tensions found in contemporary literary thought and its expression. In the Introduction, Camilletti, Gragnolati and Lampart pay special attention to the contextualization and definition of the term metamorphosis as a profoundly comprehensive and multifaceted notion.

The book is divided into four sections. Among the successes of this volume beyond the vast identification and thoughtful analyses of appropriations of Dante in contemporary literature is the discovery and re-appropriation of the notion of tension itself as a positive, rather than as a negative term. Each of the tensions identified in the various essays marks a locus of fecund ground, where literary exploration and innovation happen. Overall, this volume succeeds in demonstrating through its nineteen unique analyses that the act of metamorphosing Dante is a widespread twentieth- and twenty-first-century literary and artistic phenomenon, worthy of our attention not only as proof that understanding the past notwithstanding its medieval-ness can help provide a positive foundation for the present, but also as evidence that discovering fruit in spaces of tension has historical legitimacy.

Building a Monument to Dante: Boccaccio as Dantista. In chapter two, Boccaccio the biographer is examined as a force that shapes a figure of Dante that supported his own position in contemporary political and intellectual debates. In the third chapter, Houston delves into two lesser known works of Boccaccio in order to support his proposal of Boccaccio the apologist. Boccaccio, whose diverse literary pursuits made him too complex to fit in traditional medieval editing categories, broke the mould with his much more emancipated relationship as editor to the author.

Ever acting as a mediator of his two dominant masters, Boccaccio upheld Dante as an icon and an authoritative counterpoint to the philosophy of Petrarch. In the biographical Trattatello in laude di Dante, Houston finds that Boccaccio combines the various contemporary forms of biography to figure Dante as a man ordained by divine providence to instruct through his poetry. These advocates generally rely on the justification that Boccaccio must have undergone a radical spiritual and moral conversion in the early s.

In order to make the text accessible and meaningful to the popolani, Boccaccio keeps his Esposizioni relatively tangible with his vision of poetry as fundamentally political and ethical. In order to harmonize his reading of Dante among humanists and critics of vernacular literature, he downplays the specifically Christian allegory and interprets the Commedia as a secular text. According to Houston, Boccaccio wrote at the helm of all new literary constructions that translated wisdom, whether pagan, Christian, vernacular, or Latin, to leaders of his day who could benefit from its moral lessons.

Nonetheless, Houston pertinently reminds the reader that, despite these differences, throughout his lifelong monument-building process on behalf of Dante, Boccaccio always kept Petrarch in mind, and never abandoned the hope of harmonizing his two masters. As a result, not only Boccaccio scholarship but also students and scholars of the literary environment of the tre corone will benefit greatly from this book. Dante in Oxford. The Paget Toynbee Lectures. Nine lectures delivered between and are presented in this collection of the Paget Toynbee Lectures; four of these are here published for the first time.

Regarding textual changes introduced by De Robertis, Leonardi points out sentences with a modern syntax and, vice-versa, syntagms whose meanings have precedents in Duecento poetry. He also discusses choices relating to three enduring debates. He dwells on sources such as Boethius, pseudo-Seneca, Ovid, Juvenal, Lucan, at times mediated by Brunetto or Boethius himself, through whom Dante renewed the concepts of nobility and generosity , This essay briefly outlines the initial diffusion of the poem with bibliography updated to to concentrate on metaphors variously elaborated by Dante, each time enriching them to complete their meaning.

Distancing himself from Charles S. The use of important editions such as Brunetto Tresor, edited by P. Beltami et al. Some inaccuracies also occur in the index of names. The book offers an overview of on contemporary Dante Studies from various countries, and it thus shows how different approaches, from Italy and from the Anglo-Saxon scholarship, can exchange results.

Disreputable Bodies gives a refreshing perspective on these philosophical discourses. Simultaneously, however, matter is the active force behind the ever-changing couplings of the elements. Matter is akin to the sexually aroused woman who continually couples with a fervent desire. These thinkers arrive at such symbols not based on Aristotle alone, but on the interventions of other thinkers and traditions.

The Neoplatonic tradition, Plotinus, Maimonides, and Thomas Aquinas are but some of the influences Kodera recognizes in postulating the association between matter and a sexually desirous woman or prostitute. He establishes two parallel and at times complementary lines of investigation that are evident in this first chapter and continue throughout the book: gendered metaphors and deliberate misreadings of ancient sources.

In the Neoplatonic context, Kodera examines the many female and overwhelmingly negative associations Ficino makes with matter. Matter is the mirror image that ensnared Narcissus the soul and pulled him down to destruction ; matter is the female womb that traps and imprisons the soul, and, through the mirror influence of the liver, can receive alien imagery that changes the foetus. How does Kodera arrive at these bold assertions and expose the implicit meaning of these metaphors? Such misreading is at times the result of Renaissance thinkers tempering their Peripatetic or Platonic philosophies with the interventions of other authors such as the Rabbinic tradition in the Neoplatonic works of Leone Ebreo , or even new technologies distillation, primitive forms of plastic surgery that offer more dimensions to an already existing metaphor.

In other instances, the Renaissance philosophers deliberately ignore or misconstrue passages from Platonic texts that are contrary to their personal philosophy. Disreputable Bodies gives thought-provoking perspectives on long-studied philosophical discourses. It is not by accident that Kodera begins most chapters with citations from Shakespeare that make use of the very metaphors and abstract concepts under review in the chapter, demonstrating that by explicating these metaphors in their philosophical context, Renaissance scholars will be able to elucidate further other lingering quandaries in an assortment of literary texts.

In many ways the African American reception of Dante follows the trends in reading Dante over the centuries, but Looney focuses on what makes the African American reception of Dante unique; namely, the suggestion that Dante is a kind of abolitionist and the Divine Comedy a kind of slave narrative. The second half of the introduction tells of the surprising presence of Dante in a wax museum in Cincinnati created by Francis Trollope in First, Looney briefly considers the debate between W.

Du Bois and Booker T. Washington at the turn of the century over appropriate models of education for African Americans. At the heart of the chapter is a discussion of the imitation of the Inferno in the film Go Down, Death! While Williams uses Dante as a signifier of integration, Wright uses the Comedy to mark migration, and Ellison, as Looney explains in the concluding analysis of this chapter, employs Dante both to migrate into and to integrate his work with the European canon.

During the Black Revolution, Dante continued to be seen as a powerful model of activism and emancipation as evidenced by the early work of Baraka LeRoi Jones , who employs Dante in his expression of a new kind of militant black identity. Looney argues that, unlike Ellison and Wright who see Dante as a gateway into European culture, Baraka uses Dante first to measure the growing distance between himself and European literature, and subsequently to separate himself from it completely.

Loftis, Dudley Randall, Askia M. In terms of academic significance, Freedom Readers fills a gap in the reception of Dante in America. The chronology of African American Dante reception examined has been almost completely ignored by Dante scholars, as well as by Americanists and African Americanists. The literary imitations inspired by Dante which are examined in this book are not only useful for furthering an understanding of African American culture, but also for revealing unforeseen features of the Divine Comedy. Il primo capitolo riguarda la linguistica.

Stazio assurge a esempio paradigmatico del rapporto ambiguo — e si potrebbe aggiungere poietico —col testo virgiliano. Dante seguirebbe qui la stessa metodologia agostiniana, nella rilettura di testi classici in un nuovo sistema di significati. Si tratta di Catone, Dido ed Enea.

Marchesi non solo adotta un approccio costruttivista nella sua speculazione, ma lo attribuisce allo stesso Dante, quale autore e teorizzatore del linguaggio poetico. Riferendosi al capitolo 24 del Purgatorio, Dante mostrerebbe attraverso Stazio la differenza tra una corretta lettura costruttivista e una, inappropriata, di stampo oggettivista. Questo limite emerge soprattutto a proposito della tesi secondo cui Dante si appropria della lettura riservata al testo sacro per applicarla al suo capolavoro.

Patrologia Graeca 53, Ravenna: Longo, Imprenscindibile in questo contesto il ruolo svolto da edizioni e traduzioni, che reintroducono nel circuito intellettuale opere di difficile accesso e talora assai rare. Negli altri due saggi, Elizabeth Fiedler discute il contesto religioso e iconografico del lavoro di Marinella, mentre Ryan Gogol si sofferma sul rapporto letterario tra la scrittrice e Cristofano Bronzini.

Una, Margherita Sarrocchi, sembra essere stata un punto di riferimento per Marinella, con la sua Scanderbeide e Sin dal primo canto il lettore familiarizza con i toni elevati e le immagini potenti, come nel caso della descrizione della flotta veneziana I, 30 sgg. Risulta insomma fondamentale ritornare in possesso di, e avere a disposizione, questo tassello del mosaico epico italiano e della letteratura seicentesca. Pare si dilettasse di poesia epica anche Giovan Battista Marino.

Fra i molti su questo argomento che furono scritti nel Seicento si veda quello sulla translatio della Santa Casa di Loreto dalla Palestina ai colli lauretani: Il tempio peregrino, poema sacroeroico di Giulio Acquaticci, recentemente edito a cura di Dino S. Cervigni, Roma, Aracne, , pp. Come questa meritoria edizione riconferma. The Controversy of Renaissance Art. I rarely come across studies that truly debunk long-established assumptions about their own field of research.

In The Controversy of Renaissance Art, Alexander Nagel meditates on Renaissance scholarship, on theoretical assumptions that have been — perhaps — too often taken for granted, and argues for a new interpretation of the artistic works of this period. It is well before those years, in fact, that the connections between sacred iconography and lay painting were subject to a profound scrutiny on the part of many Italian painters, who found new ways of depicting lay themes by reworking, reinterpreting sacred images.

From sacred iconography to the role of art itself, whether instrumental to the delight of private individuals or to form a collective conscience, virtually everything is scrutinized. He argues for the need to look at the research of religious historians to understand artistic texts in an utterly different way. This is a part of the Renaissance less studied and less taken for granted, particularly in Southern Europe — Italy, that is. Nagel convincingly argues that there did not exist a specific program that addressed nudity or improper visual interpretations of sacred images. Everything was placed in the hands of the individual surveyors and their artistic sensibility.

When, then, did artistic license become a problem? Idolatry comes as a result of putting certain esthetic criteria on a scale, a scale that is a product of society. As such, its connotation varies from Florence to Northern Europe. What is recognizable in the Netherlands i. Doubling — the character and the real person who modeled for it — produces a theatrical effect The widespread use of wax effigies in Florence at the time has a role in the passage between inserting portraits of real people of the time into paintings representing sacred images.

Ghirlandaio is a good example of creating balance between sacred figures and portraits of Florentines of his time in his Tornabuoni chapel How do you avoid idolatric worshiping, then? How do you rethink image? The scholar addresses this issue from multiple points and perspectives. In the pre-Council of Trent period, we had the debate about the supremacy of sculpture over painting, with different positions taken by Castiglione, Bronzino, and Benedetto Varchi, respectively, but not exclusively. They all recognized the importance of sculpture for the urban landscape.

The illustrations in this volume are superb. The layout of the book renders justice to the masterpieces with which and of which Nagel is conversing. The challenge in question deals with the hidden aspects of the Rinascimento. Nagel offers such an enjoyable and refreshing look at this complex period that I truly suggest this read to scholars, for he proves the fallacy of some aspects of art history and its connections to the society of the period, thus making manifest the dynamic force of scholarly criticism.

But it is always, and especially, a critical reading of the reality a painting interprets. Kissing the Wild Woman. This work has been overlooked by early modern and contemporary scholars alike. With Kissing the Wild Woman, Nissen provides a welcome and discerning examination of Urania, considering the literary, historical, and art-historical contexts surrounding the author. Nissen devotes particular attention to Boccaccio, whose Fiammetta and Filocolo helped shape the prose romance genre in Italian.

In the end, the fictional Urania and the historical Bigolina are in many ways corresponding figures. While dominant male voices in the century would argue that a woman should achieve self- expression by posing for paintings, Bigolina counters that women can find a more appropriate outlet by harnessing the written word. By devoting due attention to a complex and neglected early modern prose romance, and by writing in a language accessible to scholars and students in all fields, Nissen gives Bigolina the voice she deserves.

The Perfect Genre. Drama and Painting in Renaissance Italy. Surrey UK : Ashgate, Following her introduction, Kristin Phillips-Court has divided her book into five main chapters, each dealing with a different play. Her focus on textual analysis is supplemented by examination of works of the visual arts: religious frescoes and panels, mythologies, allegorical portraiture, state portraits, and pastoral scenes.

The Perfect Genre is a welcome and necessary study with a truly interdisciplinary orientation. While this approach is not unusual in Italian histories of drama, it is under-represented in Anglo-American publishing. Phillips-Court organizes her investigations by first giving a close reading of select passages from the literary work under consideration. Her quotations appear in the original and in English, an intelligent choice that will make her work accessible both to university students and to scholars of English drama, who will see the relevance to the development of theater and the visual arts in a wider context.

In addition, she examines the biblical and classical sources of Italian Renaissance drama. Phillips-Court does not adequately justify overlooking the seminal productions of Bibbiena and Ariosto, presented with splendid sets by Peruzzi and Raphael. Although her interest is not in artists who were involved in mounting theatrical productions, it would have strengthened her art historical readings to have addressed this field of artistic exchange.

Her examination of Tasso is rich and original. Tasso, like Dante and Boccaccio, inspired many artists, but Phillips-Court is concerned to demonstrate the productive dialectical relationship between word and image. The final chapters on Tasso and Bruno deal with philosophical and metaphysical debates. Phillips-Court shows that she is equally at home with cultural history and political theory. Phillips-Court analyzes the self-fashioning of Paul III Alessandro Farnese and of his family members, in which Titian played so important a role as portraitist, while Caro filled the position of humanist secretary.

Rather, Titian took the unprecedented step of depicting a pope with his head uncovered in one of the two versions of the famous portrait, where Paul is not bald nor is his tonsure in evidence. Earlier in the sixteenth century, Raphael set a precedent in his portrait of Pope Julius II, which he followed in his subsequent portrait of Leo X. This precedent influenced Sebastiano del Piombo in several versions of Pope Clement VII, yet all of these depictions emphasized the ceremonial role of the papacy by outfitting the pope in his appropriate headgear.

Phillips-Court uses different registers of theoretical language in her study: literary criticism, historicism, film studies, art history, and visual theory. The use of film studies is informative and judiciously handled, resulting in a greater appreciation of the technical advancements of Renaissance artists and writers.

Occasionally the theory overwhelms the analysis. Was it Brunelleschi who designed the theatrical machinery? Readers of The Perfect Genre will find themselves turning to the plays and visual works in question for a closer look — an admirable achievement worthy of the best tradition of humanist exegesis. Both the black-and-white images and the color plates are nicely produced. Pp Classical intertextuality in the Furioso has been thoroughly examined on both sides of the Atlantic. Stoppino takes into consideration various kinds of intertextuality and the importance of gender and female genealogy within the Furioso.

In the first chapter, Stoppino concentrates on Bradamante as a female warrior in the Furioso and recalls her appearance as such in the cantari and poemi cavallereschi. The primary texts discussed in this chapter include two late fifteenth-century works: Historia di Bradiamonte sorella di Rinaldo Brescia, and the Inamoramento de Carlo Magno Venezia, The Ariostean incarnation of the Amazon-like figure was inspired by previous epic poetry Virgil, Pulci, Boiardo as well as by travel narratives e.

In chapter 4, Stoppino examines how genealogy is transmitted through prophecy in the poem. Melissa, for example, imparts prophetic knowledge about the future Este dynasty to Bradamante. The author carefully traces the relationship of Bradamante to medieval literary figures of the sorceress and the sibyl. The role of females within dominant patrilineal narratives becomes the main topic of this section. Specifically, she discusses how Ariosto challenges traditional patrilineal prophecy by making Bradamante the addressee of future Este dynastic knowledge.

The notion of women as political subjects becomes especially apparent in marriage when loyalty is split between a family of origin and an acquired family. In the Rocca di Tristano episode, Bradamante becomes the female founder of the Este lineage. Ariosto is able to revitalize classical tales through their medieval representations within the Furioso. The most striking is the introduction of the beauty contest for the women, absent from the French models.

Gender plays an important role, and female warriors recall the longstanding but often overlooked tradition of the genealogy of gender. Her research is precise, well-documented and uncovers several intertextual references to medieval romance narratives in the Furioso. Texts and Translations. Medieval and Renaissance Texts and Studies This edition of Florentine Sacre rappresentazioni gathers some of the religious plays by Feo Belcari and Castellano Castellani and places itself among recent works dedicated to a rediscovery of this genre.

The sacre rappresentazioni, plays representing the lives of saints or biblical episodes, now attract the interest of scholars since the elaboration of biblical and hagiographical models can provide significant insights into the cultural environment in which they were produced. The project behind this volume is ambitious and undoubtedly significant in the field of Renaissance studies.

The sacre rappresentazioni were not aimed at the learned but at a wider public, and therefore their form and content mirror the language, tastes and social habits of the average Florentine citizen. This version is the most comprehensive to this day but it cannot be considered authoritative. Perhaps new revised editions based on the manuscripts and the early prints are now necessary to substantiate or improve on the nineteenth-century versions.

Such editions might, for example, be more accurate and free of ambiguities caused by either typographical or editorial errors. The volume regrettably lacks also a complete bibliography at the end, although the footnotes provide bibliographical references, which at times appear not to be accurate or do not supply all the necessary data.

If, on one hand, Castellani satirizes the celebrated carnival songs, which probably represent to him the epitome of Medicean moral corruption Santa Maria Maddalena , p. The English translation is fluent, clear, and an excellent tool to understand especially the most difficult idiomatic sentences of this variant of Italian vernacular. With some improvements, the volume could be an authoritative and indispensable text in this area of studies.


  • Das Langzeit-EKG. Handbuch der Interpretation des Elektrokardiogramms (German Edition).
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Burlington: Ashgate Publishing Company, It was prepared for press, as editors Juliann Vitullo and Diane Wolfthal note in their Introduction, right before the global economy began its turn towards a recession and waves of protest voiced their outrage with corporate wealth and greed 1.

Several centuries beforehand, during the rise of the monetary economy between the thirteenth and seventeenth centuries , the accumulation and the expenditure of individual and institutional capital were debated in moral and ethical terms. Avarice, and not pride, increasingly began to be viewed as the root of all evils, as articulated by Thomas Aquinas in his gloss of 1 Timothy 1.

This volume focuses on the competing values that emerged during the rise of the new monetary economy during the thirteenth century, a century during which mercantile Christians, for instance, had to reckon with the example of St. The nine essays, which are pan- European and interdisciplinary, reveal the ways in which mercantile activity co- existed with prevalent views of usury and avarice. Sturges shows that the texts reveal how workers who attempted to participate in the benefits of a new monetary economy were disempowered by restraints imposed by the landed gentry.

Murray attends to the ambivalent views toward moneychangers in the Low Countries from the thirteenth through the sixteenth centuries and to the tension between the economic and social moral status of the profession. Moulton also draws a comparison between Aretino and court poets, and prostitution. Though the play The Changeling does not stage international trade mimetically, Bradley D. Miller and Laurie Taylor-Mitchell offer a lucid presentation of the commercial activities of the order in all of its apparent contradictions and reconciliations with religious piety.

The Humiliati, despite criticism, were able to engage in commercial activity in ways that were seen to benefit Christian society. Artists were able as well to deflect the idea that usury was an infertile practice through portraiture of merchant husbands and wives. Analyzing a range of documents, music, plays, poetry and prose, together with an impressive treatment of medieval and early modern iconography, Money, Morality and Culture in Late Medieval and Early Modern offers a timely and well-rounded consideration of how these debates evolved in clerical and lay spheres.

It will undoubtedly be of use to scholars in a large range of fields and disciplines, not only those under examination in these essays. Kristina M. Atti del convegno internazionale di studi. Rovereto, dicembre A cura di Marco Allegri. Rovereto: Accademia roveretana degli Agiati, Contributi non peregrini, data la natura poliglotta e transnazionalista di questo autore, che compose le Scintille in quattro lingue e compose saggi in francese, poesie in greco e latino, testi in illirico.

CLXXI, , pp. Pisa: Edizioni ETS, In questo libro Erminia Ardissino analizza le conoscenze scientifiche di Galileo esaminando la corrispondenza epistolare che Galileo aveva con i familiari, gli amici e i colleghi. Nelle lettere abbiamo un Galileo che esprime se stesso in maniera libera e disinvolta e che discute non solo di problemi scientifici ma anche di questioni della vita domestica.

Galileo fin da bambino venne introdotto alla musica dal padre Vincenzo, cantautore, suonatore di liuto e viola. Galileo fece della musica un mezzo per sviluppare le sue argomentazioni filosofico-scientifiche. Inoltre Galileo utilizzava la sua conoscenza musicale per provare le sue ipotesi riguardo ad alcune leggi fisiche. Durante gli esperimenti sulla caduta dei gravi usava ripartire il tempo secondo ritmi ed intervalli musicali Inoltre permette al lettore di immergersi nella vita quotidiana di Galileo e di ammirarlo non solo come scienziato ma anche come padre, zio, fratello, letterato, musicista e pittore.

Il secondo capitolo, La distanza della luna. Mentre il terzo capitolo Critica del moderno. Alla lettura psicanalitica del desiderio e dello sguardo leopardiano in Aspasia della quinta parte del libro Lo sguardo di Euridice. Corredano il volume una nutrita Nota bibliografica e un Indice dei nomi Il cantiere Italia: il romanzo. Capuana e Borgese costruttori. Palermo: :duepunti Edizioni, The publication of a book about two writers as important — but also systematically underestimated — as Luigi Capuana and Giuseppe Antonio Borgese, is doubtlessly an important event.

The enthusiasm and thrust for civil renovation nourished by the Risorgimento has been kept alive in his critical writings, in which culture and society are always presented as strictly entangled , After moving to Rome in , Capuana leaves partially behind the themes inherited from the European naturalist novel, and opens up to the influences of a more spiritualist stream of thought, as it is paramount in his second novel, Profumo, published in Il marchese di Roccaverdina: tra scienza e fede His most important text in this sense is Tempo di edificare, published in The author draws in these pages the portrayal of a writer who strives for this change.

In other words, Borgese inherits from De Sanctis the utopist thrust toward the creation of a new world, as it is especially expressed in the essays collected in the three series of La vita e il libro For this reason, as Carta points out repeatedly, Borgese prefers to draw his inspiration from literary models taken mostly from the last century as Giovanni Verga, , and Tolstoj, The March of Fascism, , which contains a firm condemnation of Fascism as a phenomenon of degeneration of the Italian traditional culture and identity She also makes a reference to the document The City of Man.

The Fruit, Herbs, and Vegetables of Italy Toronto: Prospect Books, He dedicated it to Lady Lucy Russell, Countess of Bedford — the sister of a former pupil — in the hope of obtaining her patronage; this did not work out so well, since Lady Lucy had her own debts to grapple with. He explains how to best grow vegetables — especially, difficult ones such as asparagus — and how to season them: olive oil and bitter orange juice figure prominently, as do salt and pepper, and he is in the habit of rubbing salad bowls with garlic, much like contemporary gourmets.

Gillian Riley, who edited and translated the text, is the author of the Oxford Companion to Italian Food Riley has also provided a useful glossary at the end of her vivacious translation. The Prodigious Muse. Italian translations are provided for each of the letters. Marsh was the American ambassador to the new Kingdom of Italy from its inception in until his death in The letters span the period of his residency in Florence, the ambassador having followed the removal of the Italian capital from Turin to that city in Grant in March of Baird, Assistant Secretary of the Smithsonian Institution, with whom Marsh shared various scientific interests.

There are only a few letters to Italian statesmen and all of these are short, diplomatic missives. He had been a Whig representative in Congress during the s where he had first met both Seward and Lincoln. Appointed U. Marsh admired Garibaldi and had tried to convince the latter to flee to the U. It was during his stay in Turin that Marsh wrote his most famous work, Man and Nature , an ecological treatise in which he points to the Mediterranean as an example of deforestation leading to desertification, and argues that steam locomotion was rapidly degrading the natural landscape.

The volume was translated into Italian in The U. In the United States was the first nation to officially recognize the Kingdom of Italy. During the American civil war only Italy and Russia had been openly in favor of the Union among the major European governments Italy depended relatively little on the importation of cotton from the Confederacy.

With regard to Italian politics and society, Marsh waivers between long- range, guarded optimism and disappointment at missteps by the ruling class. Particularly irksome to him was the subservience of government and royal policy to the dictates of the French emperor Napoleon III and his interference in Italian affairs. The letters are also punctuated by ample notes, especially biographical data. Ducci has done admirable archival research in Italy and the United States in tracking down the letters.

This is a big book in several ways. Big physically, its broad-margined pages include over eighty musical examples, reproductions of engravings, photographs, manuscript pages, programs, broadsides and proclamations, sketches of opera houses and opera house floor plans, as well as tables, color illustrations of probable costumes, and a forty-nine page bibliography of sources consulted.

The writing is admirable: balanced and elegant jargon-free prose that is often impassioned and sometimes funny, but always precise and provocative. Opera and Sovereignty is not a history of eighteenth-century Italian opera but a rich and complex series of interconnected arguments that deal with the social context of opera seria in terms of its patronage system, production methods, and reception.

Though at least partly the products of sovereign political forces, opere serie could and often did support change as well as reinforce the status quo and should not be thought of as mere establishment propaganda. For one thing, the performances of the operas of the day, especially given the prime donne and primi uomini who appeared in them, were not that easy for anyone to control. To understand these complex and frequently expensive artistic products, one must go beyond their printed scores to reconstruct actual performances, the acclaim accorded virtuoso singers, the often dazzling sets and costumes, patronage support and strictures, even the physical structures of the theaters where the operas were performed.

By appealing to feeling rather than ratiocination, these arias — often different in successive performances — communicated with their ecstatic listeners at the level not so much of plot as of the myths 33 whose transformation throughout the century Feldman chronicles. Opera and Sovereignty is divided into nine chapters plus an important epilogue. Five of these chapters are devoted to such general topics as the nature of operatic performance and reception, arias as a form of exchange, celebration and the special nature of operatic time, myths of sovereignty, and the late- century reappearance on the opera stage of mothers and a new sort of bourgeois family.

The remaining, interspersed, four chapters are case-studies of the circumstances of particular performances in Parma in , Naples in , Perugia in , and French-occupied Venice in These changes were made to de-emphasize the murderous and incestuous aspects of the Phaedra story to make it more suitable for a performance patronized by the archducal dynasty. With this provocative but persuasive conclusion Feldman concludes her rich and exceptionally well- informed study.

Roma: Libreria Editrice Vaticana, Edition, introduction, and notes by Olimpia Pelosi. Verga, Pirandello e altri siciliani. Lecce: Edizioni Milella, Il discorso procede con un capitolo dedicato alle valenze simboliche del vino nella prosa verghiana. Nei due capitoli successivi viene esaminata una possibile influenza linguistico-tematica della poesia romanesca di Giuseppe Gioacchino Belli su Verga. La seconda parte si apre con una lettura de Il fu Mattia Pascal di Luigi Pirandello: Gibellini sottolinea come il personaggio e il suo autore siano accomunati dalla ricerca di un senso ultimo delle cose, in un mondo travolto dallo scetticismo copernicano.

Il critico si sofferma diffusamente su Berecche e la guerra, novella che ha per protagonista un professore dalle fantasie filogermaniche, per molti aspetti simile allo stesso scrittore, posto di fronte al dilemma della guerra. Di Mario Grasso viene proposto un commento sui Guerrieri di Riace Canto XXIV : in questo poema il tema classico del connubio fra amore e morte si fonde con quello parallelo della follia amorosa.

Leone, ed. The Pamphilj and the Arts is a collection of seventeen essays given at a conference at Boston College in October Helping to revise this rather negative assessment of the barochetto, these scholars use the life of Cardinal Benedetto Pamphilj as a lens through which to reexamine arts patronage in the early eighteenth-century. Six lunettes depicting scenes from the life of the Virgin were originally commissioned by Cardinal Pietro Aldobrandini to decorate the vault of his private chapel. The remaining essays focus on the life of Benedetto Pamphilj. It seems that Pamphilj never threw himself into religious and political issues with the same fervor as he had when pursuing his cultural interests.

The total amount spent on his paintings was unexpectedly small, due in part to the fact that he collected still life paintings, which were less expensive. Daria Borghese reveals that, in sharp contrast to the modest amount spent on his paintings, the cardinal spared no expense on feasts and ephemeral entertainments. Stephanie Walker reconstructs this now-lost object and suggests that its extravagant design and great expense paralleled its significance as a means of communicating status.

The final section examines the written word in the life of Pamphlj. By taking the pseudonym Fenicio Larisseo, Pamphilj assumed the identity of a shepherd whose simple life sharply contrasted with that of Baroque Rome. Minor suggests that within the bucolic Arcadian setting, Benedetto could freely explore love and desire without fear of public criticism. Ugo Foscolo and English Culture. London: Legenda, Nella compagine del voluminoso carteggio, in cui a riflessioni di ordine privato sono intercalate disquisizioni critico-letterarie, Parmegiani discerne la costante di temi e stilemi sentimentali che tradiscono una sostenuta, per quanto sottile, presenza sterniana.

Se la prima sezione del quarto e conclusivo capitolo ribadisce la predilezione foscoliana per la letteratura inglese ed individua nel teatro shakespeariano, nella poesia sepolcrale e negli scritti di Pope, le letture che valsero a nutrire ed assecondare il proprio interesse, Parmegiani si sofferma nella sezione finale sulle ultime pagine del carteggio risalenti invece al decennio trascorso in Inghilterra.

Partecipe di un consistente e costruttivo dialogo critico con altri studiosi, Parmegiani non trascura di sondare, nel corso della propria disamina, il circostante terreno di ricerca presentando al lettore un resoconto attento ed attuale. Il libro costituisce in questa prospettiva un compendio indispensabile agli studi, tuttora in fieri, sui variegati rapporti intrattenuti da Foscolo con la cultura inglese.

A questo elaborato mosaico Parmegiani ha avuto il merito di aggiungere con la propria indagine un autorevole tassello mancante. Oriani e la narrazione della nuova Italia. Massa: Transeuropa, Il secondo capitolo, La narrazione della nuova Italia, tratta del rapporto tra Oriani e Carducci. Un attento esame della corrispondenza di Oriani mette in luce il difficile rapporto che lo scrittore intrattiene nei suoi ultimi anni con gli editori, primo fra tutti Ricciardi, che, dopo gli scarsi risultati di vendite de La rivolta ideale , rifiuta di pubblicare la raccolta di articoli Fuochi di bivacco edita poi da Laterza nel Sul materialismo leopardiano.

Tra pensiero poetante e poetare pensante. Milano: Mimesis, Nel laboratorio intellettuale dello Zibaldone, infine, il lettore contemporaneo viene sfidato a nuove interrogazioni sulla condizione umana e orientato verso una originalissima e vitale chiave ermeneutica. Byron and the Rhetoric of Italian Nationalism. New York: Palgrave Macmillan, Despite his seemingly lifelong personal and political meanderings, Byron is remembered for his consistent — though at times reluctant — support of the disenfranchised and downtrodden. Nevertheless, Byron remained committed to the pursuit of liberty from tyranny in all its guises no matter where, or from whom, the source.

The book invites readers to envision modes of rhetoric and perceptions of Italian nationalism through a Byronic lens. Here, Schmidt makes manners relevant to the struggle for Italian liberation.

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In July of , when Byron set sail on the Hercules to join the war for Greek independence, he intended to return to Italy. The poet succumbed to complications from a fever while he was still in Greece and he died during the spring of The latter have been brought to the attention of a wide public due to the success of the MTV reality show Jersey Shore in The volume is divided into three sections.

The first section collects articles originally published on the website i-Italy. For Cappelli this vision is, to a certain extent, a fiction in that it both ignores the diversity that characterizes the diaspora and romanticizes its links with the home country. Jerry Krase ironically reflects on his own past as a teenager in a period when everyone used ethnic slurs to refer to out-group members and paid a lot of attention to looking cool, in order to underscore how ethnic and other stereotypes have always existed and have been used against all groups in the U.

Chiara Montalto discusses the role of youth subcultures in helping individuals find their place and their voice, and also advocates the importance of discussing differences within the Italian American community, a point shared by Chiara Roberto. He argues that protest as a sole strategy can never be successful unless it is paired with an effort to construct a distinctive culture.

Section two presents interviews with prominent Italian American intellectuals: Maria Laurino, Donna Chirico, Nancy Carnevale, Gianfranco Norelli, and the Italian journalist Aldo Grasso, all of whom agree on the importance of analyzing and debating the Guido phenomenon instead of trying to dismiss it. He argues that Guidos are the target of criticism and disgust because they represent popular culture, rather than the high culture that other members of the community identify with. Senator Diane Savino closes the collection of essays reminding Italian Americans that the Guido culture has been an outlet for young people who needed an identity that they could embrace, and that the real enemies are not the youngsters who created the subculture but rather those who distort it and exploit it in order to make a profit.

The various contributions to this volume offer a glimpse into an important process of maturation within the Italian American intellectual community. Indeed, the first step in such processes is always the recognition of internal complexity and of a plurality of voices. That this complexity was negated in the past is comprehensible, since ethnic minorities need to show a well recognizable and unified public face in order to gain acceptance.

But such acceptance is not in question today, and Italian Americans need to move on and shift from a defensive to an analytical stance. It is significant that while, until recently, Donald Tricarico was almost alone in paying attention to Italian American youth styles, it is becoming more and more mainstream today to study identity practices among members of Italian American groups.

It is only by accepting this basic principle about the way identity processes work that the Italian American community can make progress, and for that reason, I see this volume as a first step in the right direction. Postscritto a Giorgio Bassani. Saggi in memoria del decimo anniversario della morte.