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Since one person does not receive revelation for another, if we would exchange or convey knowledge, we must be willing to have our knowledge tested. The gifted and zealous Mr.

Annotated Bibliography: N.T. Wright and the New Perspectives on Paul by

Such practitioners are asking me to take their zeal as an adequate substitute for knowledge; but like Brother Olney, they refuse to have their knowledge tested. How many a Latter-day Saint has told me that he can understand the scriptures by pure revelation and does not need to toil at Greek or Hebrew as the Prophet and the Brethren did in the School of the Prophets at Kirtland and Nauvoo?

New converts often get the idea that having accepted the gospel, they have arrived at adequate knowledge. This article is cross-posted with the permission of the author, Stephen O. There is a message that you missed in your congratulations to the Heartland folks for their commercial success. The Mesoamerica folks have been promoting their theory in books, tours, conferences, and in LDS education settings and materials for about 35 years and have obviously failed to convince the majority of Latter-day Saints of their position.

There are several reasons for this but primarily, in spite of the efforts to educate them otherwise, most Latter-day Saints adhere to the two points that I made in my comments below, that Joseph Smith believed that many Nephites in Book of Mormon times dwelt in the heartland, and that there is only one Cumorah. The Limited Mesoamerica theory rejects both of these factors. Perhaps it is time to reevaluate some of the assumptions upon which the Limited Mesoamerica theory is based?

If you have paid any attention to any of my posts on Interpreter over the past six years you will know that I am not a supporter of the Heartland Theory nor of the Mesoamerica Theory. Both theories have some good evidence for their support, but both theories have significant disqualifying conflicts with the text of The Book of Mormon.

There is a third option that brings together these two competing theories. Having said that, I take exception to two of your arguments in the preceding analysis not to imply that I agree with everything else. Also, your dismissal on the grounds that this may have occurred after the Book of Mormon period is not valid because the few surviving Nephites were either killed or became Lamanites.

Moroni They would therefore not have enough presence for a territory to be named after them. Joseph Smith had additional revelations about the Nephites with many details not mentioned in the Book of Mormon. There are at least seven historical documents stating or showing that before the plates were translated it was Moroni who told Joseph Smith that the hill in New York was called Cumorah by the ancients. I will only mention two prime examples which are the quotes from Oliver Cowdery and David Whitmer that specifically state that it was Moroni who told Joseph Smith that the hill in New York was anciently called Cumorah.

Pratt p Backman, Jr.


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These men are two of the Three Witnesses to The Book of Mormon, so to dismiss or discredit their witness of the New York Cumorah damages the credibility of their witness of the Book of Mormon itself. Thank you for your very thorough rebuttal of this book. Me thinks both sides do protest too much. For me it is difficult to believe that the Nephite civilization was located anywhere but North America for the following reasons: 1 it is the location for the New Jerusalem, 2 it is where the First Vision occurred, an event that was destined to change the world and prepare the world for the Second Coming, 3 it is the site of the Garden of Eden, and 4 it is the focal point for the spread of the gospel.

Surely this is the promised land, a land choice above all other lands. I am not a scholar or a researcher, I just subscribe to what to me is logic. Your email address will not be published. Notify me of followup comments via e-mail. You can also subscribe without commenting. Help us improve Interpreter Radio by sending us an email with your suggestions for topics we can discuss.

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The material in this volume is really that good. The idea of Sandman , that was confirmed with every issue I eventually sampled but in sampling couldn't really suggest the scope of Gaiman's accomplishment, is really the fulfillment of the literary potential of mainstream comics, what Moore could only conceive in his dreams heh. But the problem is, this is a long series, and its somewhat episodic nature makes it difficult to digest in full.

Ulysses Annotated

What Gaiman really does is something akin to Arabian Nights whether this was the intention or what happened along the way, I don't know. Which means, like Aladdin the best stuff in it may be somewhat unrelated to the bigger story, and chances are that material is found in this volume. Although there are of course two more to follow, and I will be reading them in relatively short order at last! But coming back to the nature of this particular version of the collected Sandman , it cannot be overstated how valuable Leslie Klinger's work here really is.

If Sandman is to be appreciated as not just great comics material but great literary material, it must be embraced on a literary scale. Moore's Watchmen made it to Time's list of the hundred best pieces of 20th century fiction. But again, I think Moore's best utterly pales in comparison to what Gaiman accomplishes in this volume alone. Gaiman's sheer breadth of knowledge is awe-inspiring, the truly original takes he manages even on characters who've become movie icons in Marvel's Thor , in what are utterly throwaway appearances this volume, for example. Klinger's notes are a whole level of interest in and of themselves.

He doesn't attempt or need to comment on every page, and while at times his notes echo plot points spelled out in the story itself, and he rarely feels the need to explain something that appeared in the previous volume again, none of this detracts from the valuable service he provides. His is the first truly scholarly approach to Gaiman's work I could be wrong, but other such efforts have been more of a commentary nature?

If Sandman in a lot of ways embodied the Goth culture that permeated the end of the millennium, it becomes increasingly relevant in its depiction of such characters as Wanda, a transsexual whose story unfolds late in the volume, a mere subplot in some respects, but emblematic of Gaiman's ability to pierce at the very heart of his topics in ways few others have managed in the quarter century that has since passed with increased awareness and tolerance of the whole LGBTQ community.

If that's not the very definition of greatness, I don't know what is. Jan 04, Liss Carmody rated it really liked it. I'm really enjoying poring through the Sandman anthologies, and this annotated version was definitely the way to go, both for the cultural reference annotations Sandman is rich in references to history, music, mythology, etc, and I catch a lot of it, but sometimes I'm too caught up to notice that I need to look something up and for the commentary included from interviews with Gaiman that discuss the intent of certain scenes, story arcs, and so forth.

The editor also occasionally drew attention I'm really enjoying poring through the Sandman anthologies, and this annotated version was definitely the way to go, both for the cultural reference annotations Sandman is rich in references to history, music, mythology, etc, and I catch a lot of it, but sometimes I'm too caught up to notice that I need to look something up and for the commentary included from interviews with Gaiman that discuss the intent of certain scenes, story arcs, and so forth.

The editor also occasionally drew attention to something in the artwork that would have otherwise escaped my notice. It was pretty neat. Season of Mists was classic Gaiman - a convergence of mythology that dealt with issues of will and power, as well as allowing some fascinating perspectives and interactions between mythologies. I particularly liked it for the glimpse into Dream's odd family dynamic, and for the British boarding school issue, which I found weirdly resonating.

Distant Mirrors is a trio of tales set in specific historical places, with famous moments of history or historical personages involved. Each of them was interesting in its own right, but they didn't seem to build together as a unit. A Game of You was a weird tale set in the modern NYC and also in a dreamland, with enough plot twists to keep me guessing. I liked that the boring, bookish Thessaly ends up playing such an unexpectedly pivotal role.


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  5. This arc was more interesting for the dynamic that built up between the characters, than because of the plot itself, which I found a little confusing and convoluted. Convergence, finally, was another pair of disconnected stories dealing in folklore and the nature of the Dreaming and the passage of time. Any of these would bear repeated reading, so I'm enjoying this thoroughly. Aug 01, Josh Lafollette rated it it was amazing.

    Thanks to its unique blend of horror, fantasy, mythology, and loads of historical and literary references, The Sandman is easily one of the best comic series of all time. While the novelty of its brilliance may have worn off after the first volume, the series continues to be entertaining as well as intellectually engaging. Though it can certainly stand by itself, the story is enriched by the great notes in this edition even if they slow the reading process a bit, or sometimes state the obvious Thanks to its unique blend of horror, fantasy, mythology, and loads of historical and literary references, The Sandman is easily one of the best comic series of all time.

    Though it can certainly stand by itself, the story is enriched by the great notes in this edition even if they slow the reading process a bit, or sometimes state the obvious. It's great to see the world of the Sandman being developed further in this volume, which contains a diverse collection of stories. Sometimes the protagonist, Dream, takes center stage, while at other times he holds back and the story follows other characters. It's particularly interesting to see more of Dream's siblings, especially his little sister death Death. However, just as soon as you really start missing him, he comes back to steal the show.

    Even though this volume contains a variety of self-contained stories, it all feels focused and cohesive. In short, if you've started reading the Sandman, keep reading, because it really does stay consistently great.

    The Book of Mormon (Annotated Edition)

    Nov 02, Jaimie rated it liked it. For readers who don't have a literary, historical, or myhtological knowledge base Klinger's commentary on Gaiman's text is xtremely useful. Yet, for people like myself who have much of this knowledge already, this book is made into nothing more than a handy reference guide.

    Klinger refrains from adding any personal speculation or groundbreaking scholarship such as appeared in Hy Bender's the Sandman Companion , so I am left feeling a bit let down. Some of Klinger's content choices were also a t For readers who don't have a literary, historical, or myhtological knowledge base Klinger's commentary on Gaiman's text is xtremely useful. Some of Klinger's content choices were also a touch strange and un-unfied including some interview snippets, yet not enough to justify, and similar practices with mention to the original scripts , so I must conclude that this book is really for the Gaiman-scholar-lite, who can't be bothered to read the actual seminal scholarly commentary.

    Nov 14, Seth rated it really liked it. I remember "Season of Mists," the storyline that makes up the first chunk of this book, as being hugely influential on me as a high school student, though in re-reading in it, I'm not sure why. And the second large chunk, "A Game of You," feels like the moment Neil Gaiman first became Neilgaimanish, Neilgaimanishness of course being Neil Gaiman's worst quality.

    As for Klinger's annotations, they're not free of the problems that plagued volume one , but they're better, though they still seem a lit I remember "Season of Mists," the storyline that makes up the first chunk of this book, as being hugely influential on me as a high school student, though in re-reading in it, I'm not sure why.

    As for Klinger's annotations, they're not free of the problems that plagued volume one , but they're better, though they still seem a little lost and scant. I buy annotated editions for the annotations -- if they're lacking, why don't I spend my money on the full-color Absoulte Sandman books? Mar 05, Connolly rated it really liked it. This is the 2nd out of 5 volumes containing the complete comic series The Sandman.

    Continue to follow the adventures of Dream, as he regains power and control of his realm. I found myself undergoing a crash course in Irish history and Roman Catholic theology, as presented through the annotations, which also presented a problem in understanding the basic story, as I lost myself with diversions. Then things started to settle down. Once Bloom entered the stage, I began to enjoy some of the story and its setting. The endless notations about whether so-and-so was actually a fishmonger at the corner of such-and-such street in the annotations I found less than useless, however for scholars, such information might prove necessary; for the casual reader, it is superfluous.

    This is not a book that will survive years, though, I feel—at least, not without the annotations—for it relies so much on things that are fading so quickly. Whereas Shakespeare had the ability to put something in his plays for everyone, scholar and groundling, Joyce may have forgotten the little people. Am I glad to have read this book? Certainly, if only to be able to say that I have read it, and to understand when someone makes an allusion to it. But it is a flawed masterpiece. View all 3 comments. May 02, Morgan rated it it was amazing Shelves: lit-crit-academia. This is one of the most useful guidebooks I've ever encountered.

    While at first I was overwhelmed by the sheer number of entries, I soon soon found myself reading the books side by side. There are more obvious entries that explain in detail literary or historical events and more obscure ones which really get into some of the more nuanced aspects of Joyce's book. There is no denying that Ulysses is difficult on its own, delving into the social and political context of turn-of-the-century Ireland This is one of the most useful guidebooks I've ever encountered.

    There is no denying that Ulysses is difficult on its own, delving into the social and political context of turn-of-the-century Ireland can make it all the more opaque, especially as this landscape is aligned with the Greek tradition. These annotations, for me, made the book far more manageable. It did take me quite a long time to read with the guidebook but you can't half-ass Ulysses. If I hadn't read it with the annotations, I think I may have missed a good chunk of what makes this book so great.

    On of the things I liked the most about this book is its accessibility. I used it as an undergrad and I didn't find the entries to be bogged down by a ton of academic lexicon. The book is difficult enough without the explanatory notes being impossible to get through. If you plan on reading Ulysses, spring for this as well. Mar 12, Matt rated it it was amazing Shelves: joycenalia , lit-crit , eire. Excellent guide to Mister Joyce's big book of the daytime Only quarrel is the page references are for an edition that isn't mine own, my beloved Vintage version, but ah whatever.

    It's not hard to look stuff up when you need to. By having it around, it enhances your reading experience of Ulysses and, by extension, your experience of readin Excellent guide to Mister Joyce's big book of the daytime By having it around, it enhances your reading experience of Ulysses and, by extension, your experience of reading. View all 9 comments.

    Jan 12, Eric rated it it was amazing Shelves: criticism. The amount of information is just at the border of overwhelming. Mar 16, David rated it it was amazing. After better equipping myself for the reread, I only found more supplemental reading I have yet to take in. The largest portion of that is more Shakespeare. A growing concern, but not an immediate one, of mine is my dependence on Gifford.

    At some point, I will have to cut the cord and go it alone, and I wonder at how I'll fare without such a valuable and trusty I started "Penelope" today on my second tour through Ulysses , so I thought I would add my newest thoughts on Gifford's annotations. At some point, I will have to cut the cord and go it alone, and I wonder at how I'll fare without such a valuable and trusty guide. I seemed to lean on it just as heavily as I did that first time through. I feel this is just a testament to the dedication of this great Ulysses scholar. How can one not wish to benefit from a work which could be compiled only by someone who is that passionate about this novel?

    The preface advises that this reference is to be kept open and to be read alongside the novel. That might sound like a bit much, but one finds out quickly that this is an indispensable companion Gifford's obviously tireless work and dedication is organized and laid out clearly for all who want to take the plunge into Ulysses.

    Shelves: literary-criticism. Necessary companion to Ulysses, which is as big as Ulysses. You won't understand Ulysses without it. Aug 20, J. Very usable, an encyclopedic approach to the arcana of Ulysses. An important facet of this volume is that it is not a summary, nor is it a condensation or analysis of what happens in the novel. If you want something that explains, "here Bloom's question reveals more than he is saying and indicates This book is all about translating the Latin, the Greek, the Dublinisms, the limericks, the popular song and riddle and the millions of strange little phrases and wo Very usable, an encyclopedic approach to the arcana of Ulysses.

    This book is all about translating the Latin, the Greek, the Dublinisms, the limericks, the popular song and riddle and the millions of strange little phrases and words with which Joyce loves to baffle the reader. Only two quibbles here. The first, minor quibble is that not all the questions prompted by the miscellanea of the text are answered here.

    That might require a book twice as thick, but it's surely not impossible. The second, and overwhelmingly Major Quibble-- this should really be fixed -- is the reluctance of Gifford's volume to ever repeat itself, even in brief, even for clarity's sake, even for the convenience of the user. When something peculiar is mentioned once, even briefly, Mr. Gifford's dutiful fact checkers note, transcribe, post and define that something, along with its peculiarities, right away.

    After which, each and every mention thereof is re-directed backwards in this fat volume to that first mention with a very annoying "See pp. So perhaps Mr Gifford can picture the reader, utilizing his Annotated guide, coming across a reference to, say, "red tape", late in the book.

    Perhaps being some tens of thousands of words away from its first occurrence, he will be forgiven for forgetting the meaning, and permitted to check the guide. So he saves his place in Ulysses , puts aside that volume and picks up the Annotated guide. After finding his current position correlated by Mr Gifford, he is relieved to find that the expression is indeed noted at that mark. But he will find that if what he wants-- and he does-- is to find out what meaning "red tape" may have, he is to be re-directed by the helpful Mr Gifford by the entry that reads "Red Tape, see pp.

    At which point he can reverse backwards into the early part of the guide and find the very first appearance of that term. Once he is reminded of the meaning of the term, he may put down the Annotated and go back to where he left his bookmark in Ulysses. I would suggest that the novel itself is enough labyrinthine red tape to be navigating, and that a brief re-statement of terms, a reminder at the point where it occurs in the current chapter --would best serve the reader engaged in this endeavor. Jul 11, Heather rated it liked it Recommends it for: anyone reading or planning to read Ulysses.

    This book is wonderful, and I don't think I could make it through Ulysses without it. The admittedly unfair reason I give it only three stars is because of my dislike for having to read two heavy, bulky books at once. I loved the introduction to the annotations with the thoughtful suggestions on how to manage the task of simultaneous reading and the concise, engaging summary of events in Irish history that surround the day Ulysses takes place.

    Marvels Annotated #2 (2019)

    I had never read a thing before about anti-semitis This book is wonderful, and I don't think I could make it through Ulysses without it. I had never read a thing before about anti-semitism in Ireland and appreciated the valuable glimpse into its origins, as well as the key players in the struggle for Home Rule. Oct 04, hypothermya rated it liked it Shelves: literature , modern.

    This supplementary book of annotation and background info is indispensable if you are giving Ulysses a go. Keep in mind that the annotations themselves are somewhat intimidating -- averaging a page of notes per page of Joyce's writing. Including the background and plan for each section for example, Joyce has a character from the Odyssey, a set of colors, an organ, a theme, a time of day, etc. However, it enriches the text tenfold and is well worth investing in. Jan 03, Thomas rated it really liked it Shelves: lit-crit , joyce.

    Indispensable for a close reading of Ulysses; a hindrance for its enjoyment. It is a trustworthy and useful reference, but don't make it your constant companion. Jun 03, Geoff rated it it was amazing. Essential to anyone who cares about this book. Ulysses has been creeping back into my life in weird ways recently. Perhaps an epic rereading in the near future?? Jan 28, Ambreen added it. Adding this to my read list with no rating so the app will stop recommending I read it.

    Covers just about everything and even indicates the Gabler changes. This book is best used as an encyclopedic reference guide, I couldn't imagine reading it cover to cover, at least on a first reading of Ulysses. My review here. Jan 25, Will Mego rated it it was amazing. This book provides amazing support for the reader esp. Very highly recommended. May 14, Connie rated it it was amazing Recommends it for: Die-Hard lit scholars.

    Shelves: classics. If you're going to read Joyce's Ulysses , then ignore all those who will ask you why. It's funny, beautiful, desperate, and well worth the effort - but not without this guide. This encyclopedic volume takes you line by line through every allusion, symbol, and reference in Joyce's book and really will heighten your experience of Ulysses. This Herculean work must have taken years and years of research, but thank God for it!