Free download. Book file PDF easily for everyone and every device. You can download and read online The Leeds Book of Days file PDF Book only if you are registered here. And also you can download or read online all Book PDF file that related with The Leeds Book of Days book. Happy reading The Leeds Book of Days Bookeveryone. Download file Free Book PDF The Leeds Book of Days at Complete PDF Library. This Book have some digital formats such us :paperbook, ebook, kindle, epub, fb2 and another formats. Here is The CompletePDF Book Library. It's free to register here to get Book file PDF The Leeds Book of Days Pocket Guide.
Historian – Researcher – Writer

Susan Lewis CBE. George Stephenson. Hunter Davies. A History of London's Prisons. Enemies of the State. Bloody British History: Camden. Marianne Colloms. Curious Tales from West Yorkshire. Howard Peach. The Gloucester Book of Days. Jill Evans. The Portsmouth Book of Days. John Sadden. Stephen Halliday. Recollections of Old Liverpool. A Nonagenarian.

A Grim Almanac of Shropshire. Samantha Lyon. Diaries of Ireland. Melosina Lenox-Conyngham. Hanged at Lincoln. Foul Deeds and Suspicious Deaths in York. Keith Henson. The York Book of Days. Robert Woodhouse. To Prove I'm Not Forgot. Sylvia M Barnard. Nicholas Corder.

The Isle of Wight Book of Days. Three Accounts of Peterloo.

Titanic Enya Book of Days

Edward Stanley. The People of Ormskirk. Mona Duggan. Anne Bradford. Four Faces. Phil Batman. Coach Driving - The Coaching Revival. Showell's Dictionary of Birmingham. Thomas T. Harman and Walter Showell. Norwich Murders. Maurice Morson. A Genius for Money. Caroline Dakers. David Ross. Worcestershire in the Nineteenth Century. The Manchester Book of Days.

Bonsai Book of Days Project

Ben McGarr. Richard Whittington-Egan. Haunted Salisbury. Frogg Moody. Bernard McCormick. The Derby Book of Days. Sarah Seaton. The Glasgow Book of Days. Norman Ferguson. Foul Deeds in Richmond and Kingston. The Liverpool Book of Days. Steven Horton. Melosina Lenox-Conyngham. Hanged at Lincoln. Foul Deeds and Suspicious Deaths in York. Keith Henson. York Book of Days. Robert Woodhouse.

To Prove I'm Not Forgot. Sylvia Barnard. Nicholas Corder. Isle of Wight Book of Days. Three Accounts of Peterloo. Edward Stanley. The People of Ormskirk. Mona Duggan. Anne Bradford.

[eBook] The Leeds Book of Days

Four Faces. Phil Batman. Coach Driving - The Coaching Revival. Showell's Dictionary of Birmingham. Thomas T.

LBA On Twitter

Harman and Walter Showell. Norwich Murders. Maurice Morson. A Genius for Money. Caroline Dakers. David Ross. Worcestershire in the Nineteenth Century. Manchester Book of Days. Ben McGarr. Richard Whittington-Egan. Haunted Salisbury. Frogg Moody. Bernard McCormick. Derby Book of Days. Sarah Seaton. Glasgow Book of Days. Norman Ferguson. Foul Deeds in Richmond and Kingston.

Liverpool Book of Days. Steven Horton. Bury Book of Days. Sean Frain. Desmond Rainy. Tony Benton. Kill the Queen! Barrie Charles. Fred Cooper. Foul Deeds and Suspicious Deaths in and around Chesterfield. Geoffrey Sadler. Caroline Maxton. Douglas d'Enno.

Famous and Infamous Londoners. Peter de Loriol. Alan Brooke. The Diary of a Shropshire Farmer.


  • Account Options.
  • Book Of Days Series;
  • Book of Days reveals a year's worth of stories from Reading's history!
  • [eBook] The Leeds Book of Days?
  • The Cardiff Book of Days.
  • Helps and Hospitality;

Peter Davis. Tim Winter. It was said that he 'fulfilled that important though often unthankful office with infinite credit to himself and advantage to the town'. The benevolent, yet economical, guardian of the poor was often visited by the philanthropic Mr Howard, who wrote as follows: 'The poor of Leeds are well fed, and taken care of; indeed they, and the people at large, are happy in having a worthy and very honest man for the master of the workhouse, a Mr Linsley, who was formerly a manufacturer in the town. His temper and disposition, as well as those of his wife, seem peculiarly adapted to their charge; mildness and attention to the complaints of the meanest, joined with the firmness of manner, gain the respect of the respect of those who are placed under their care.

I am at the same time convinced, by his open manner in showing me the books, that he transacts the business of the town with rectitude and economy'. The mayor took the chair of the meeting, which was held at the Town Hall, to decide what course of proceedings to adopt with regards to the character of the testimonial.

It was finally agreed that a committee would be formed in order to establish the variety of testimonial the people of Leeds would like to send to Miss Nightingale — as well as public subscriptions to be open at banks, and other public places, for the people of the town. One of the Aldermen, Mr Gott, stated that, 'The public minds were full of the heroism of Miss Nightingale and that the citizens of Leeds would be anxious as to show their appreciation'.

A discussion then took place as to whether a public meeting should be called, but it was agreed that no point would be served and that the committee would decide what form the testimonial should take. A reporter from the Leeds Mercury attended the concert and described the evening. He stated that Paganini delighted his audience and it was later said that 'there was something unearthly about him The report stated that: 'We do not feel ourselves competent to speak of what may be termed as his miracles; we can admire his delightful harmonies, his cadences, his extraordinary dexterity, the more than musical sound of his fiddle.

He can make it squeak and squall, and laugh and cry, and nearly speak. He can express mirth and sorrow, tragedy, comedy or farce.

Around the World in 80 Days

His performances were hailed with unbounded applause, but he declined to obey the cries of "encore". At the end of the performance it was announced that the Great Signor himself, in a very magnificent gesture, had also gave twenty guineas to the same object. A bang as loud as a cannon was heard for miles around. Nearly all of the men who were working in the area of the explosion were killed, apart from a lucky few who were taken to the infirmary at approximately 2 a. It was thought that foul air collected in a space where the men were working, causing it to catch fire and explode.

Upon investigation it was suggested that some of the men who were killed had neglected to cover the naked flame of their lamps and more injury was claimed by something called 'black damp'. There were ten men in a distant part of the pit who, although they had felt the effects of the shock, received no further injury apart from being knocked down by the violence of the explosion. It is thought that the number of men to have been killed was twenty-four, including a young boy only five years of age.

The newspaper urged that a subscription be started in the neighbourhood, in order to alleviate the distress of the families from their losses. Leeds Intelligencer. The three women, who at the time of their marriage to Nicholls had all been widows, were also in court. The first wife, then Miss Sarah Illingworth, married Nicholls at Manchester parish church in the year They lived together as man and wife for only three months, at the end of which she left him, suffering from three broken ribs, and did not reside with him reside with him again. He lived with her for a month before leaving her; she had suspected at the time that he had another wife.

They agreed to live together again at Churwell near Leeds, but they were not together long before she had him bound over to keep the peace. The two previous wives had made acquaintance with each other in the past, and, meeting him on Leeds Bridge, they gave him into custody before finding out that a third wife had been involved.

He was sent for trial at the next assizes, where he was sentenced to be transported for seven years. The quantity of ash from the engine furnaces used in repairing the roads, harmonize with the clouds of smoke from the chimneys of the same furnaces. This pours into the loaded atmosphere making a trial for the lungs as well as the tempers of its inhabitants'. The reporter requested that 'something be done to make the roads more passable'.