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Of course, Lazarus' family and friends must have learned something about his journey to heaven and back. And many of us today are familiar with the testimonies of people who have had near-death experiences. But each of these accounts are unique, and can only give us a glimpse into heaven. In fact, the Bible reveals very few concrete details about heaven, the afterlife and what happens when we die.

40 Bible Verses about Eternal Life

God must have a good reason for keeping us wondering about the mysteries of heaven. Perhaps our finite minds could never comprehend the realities of eternity. For now, we can only imagine. Yet the Bible does reveal several truths about the afterlife. This study will take a comprehensive look at what the Bible says about death, eternal life and heaven.

Psalm Even though I walk through the valley of the shadow of death, I will fear no evil, for you are with me; your rod and your staff, they comfort me. O death, where is your victory? O death, where is your sting? But thank God! He gives us victory over sin and death through our Lord Jesus Christ. Philippians But if I live, I can do more fruitful work for Christ. Psalm Surely goodness and love will follow me all the days of my life, and I will dwell in the house of the LORD forever. John "Do not let your hearts be troubled.

Trust in God; trust also in me. In my Father's house are many rooms; if it were not so, I would have told you. Take hold of the eternal life to which you were called when you made your good confession in the presence of many witnesses. I consider that our present sufferings are not worth comparing with the glory that will be revealed in us. Romans NIV salvation suffering. Indeed, the water I give them will become in them a spring of water welling up to eternal life. Whoever finds their life will lose it, and whoever loses their life for my sake will find it.

Matthew NIV suffering life. Whoever sows to please their flesh, from the flesh will reap destruction; whoever sows to please the Spirit, from the Spirit will reap eternal life. Galatians NIV sin Spirit harvest. But for that very reason I was shown mercy so that in me, the worst of sinners, Christ Jesus might display his immense patience as an example for those who would believe in him and receive eternal life.

For the Lord loves the just and will not forsake his faithful ones. Wrongdoers will be completely destroyed; the offspring of the wicked will perish. Psalm NIV reliability righteousness. Therefore he is able to save completely those who come to God through him, because he always lives to intercede for them. Hebrews NIV Savior salvation. So that, just as sin reigned in death, so also grace might reign through righteousness to bring eternal life through Jesus Christ our Lord.

Romans NIV sin grace. But as the point of Eternal Life, this is how its meant to go. A brilliant light matriarch, dies at 90, leaving behind a family that adored her, and learned from her.

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She was devotion and spunk. But loss is loss all the same - and as the book so clearly shows in its nuances, one wouldn't want to live forever. Its just horrible in many other ways. The book really shows you that its about what means something to you that makes living worthwhile.

The experience of the book and the questions within and the story truly was very valuable to me, and I think I will enjoy the discussion. And again, its a book I wouldn't have picked up. I'm ultimately glad I heard and read it. This is one of the more beautiful books I've read in some time, and a refreshing reminder that there are still occasionally brand-new pleasures to be found in contemporary fiction, even if you have to read a hundred novels with completely expected storylines to find the next unique exception.

It's the story of a woman named Rachel, an Israeli Jew living in Roman times, who in a moment of grief is convinced to swear an obscure Hebrew vow that will cure her deathly sick child, but render her immor This is one of the more beautiful books I've read in some time, and a refreshing reminder that there are still occasionally brand-new pleasures to be found in contemporary fiction, even if you have to read a hundred novels with completely expected storylines to find the next unique exception.

It's the story of a woman named Rachel, an Israeli Jew living in Roman times, who in a moment of grief is convinced to swear an obscure Hebrew vow that will cure her deathly sick child, but render her immortal and ensure death to anyone she reveals this info to; and sure enough, that's exactly what happens, with Rachel continuing to live through dozens of generations and hundreds of children, all the way up to our present time, heartbreakingly required to burn herself alive once every half-century or so and start all over again in another new year-old body at yet another random place on the planet.

Our story, then, is a cleverly plotted look at this two-thousand-year life Rachel has now lived, hopping back and forth across historical periods and doing a deep dive along the way of Jewish history and customs. Along the way, then, the novel has loads to say about family, love, aging and grief, taking a curiously Buddhist tone to these topics and weaving in such contemporarily trendy subjects as gene therapy and blockchain cryptocurrency, but while tying them back to the pagan magic and witchcraft of Rachel's Roman youth.

It all adds up to an utterly unique and unexpected story, one with a hugely satisfying emotional payoff at the end, a novel that both informed me as a Gentile and that sparked my imagination in a way few other contemporary novels in the last year have. That's always a lovely experience to have, for someone like me who burns through so much contemporary fiction each year and is inevitably disappointed with 90 percent of it, and I was so impressed that I think I'm going to put Horn's four previous novels on my "to be read" list as well, something I almost never do with living authors.

I look forward to seeing if the rest of them hold up to this enchanting, thought-provoking newest. Elyse Walters We match on this book! This is a sweeping look at eternity and the love that binds parents and their child. We make deals with God all the time - in times of despair or just when we need a bit of good luck but would you make a deal to live forever in exchange for God sparing the life of your son.

That is exactly what Rachel and the boy's father did in biblical times. Rachel has watched her hundreds of children grow old, outlived all of her husbands only to die and be reborn as someone new. Her true love also made the This is a sweeping look at eternity and the love that binds parents and their child. Her true love also made the pact and they continue to meet up but never stay together for long. When one of Rachel's grandchildren tries to study the secret of her longevity and asks for a DNA sample for a study her world spins out of control. The blend of old Hebrew teachings made modern and the flashbacks back to Rachel's first life is magical.

My thanks to the publisher for the advance copy. Oct 10, M. How many mothers would gladly give their life to save their child? Two thousand years and many lives and deaths later, Rachel is ready to really die. In the modern era, her favorite granddaug How many mothers would gladly give their life to save their child? In the modern era, her favorite granddaughter, Hannah is a scientist studying DNA who may finally be able to give Rachel what she wants most, a real death.

There were parts of this book I really enjoyed-including the concept. But somewhere along the way, it seemed to dwell on go into large parts like Rocky's life that didn't really seem to go with the theme. It seemed disjointed to me. I enjoyed the biblical history parts and the concept about doing anything for your children and also how dying really does make life worth living. Mar 27, Vicki rated it really liked it Shelves: fiction , , fantasy. This is an interesting one. It is no spoiler by any means to say that Rachel has been alive for over 2, years.

It's also not really a spoiler to say that somebody else from her time has been, too, and he's more or less been stalking her through the millennia, trying to get her to see things his way. I mean that only structurally. Something seems off about it. Maybe that's pacing, or maybe that's a lack of impact when something big is revea Hmm. Maybe that's pacing, or maybe that's a lack of impact when something big is revealed?

Or maybe there are just too many delicious things left on the plate, things you wish Horn would have gone into a little bit more. Something about this book leaves your interest peaked, but slightly unsatisfied. That said, the reason I liked it as much as I did is that it's a fascinating concept, one that I think the author does a great deal of justice to. I read it in less than a day -- every opportunity I had to pick it up, I would devour a few pages.

View all 3 comments. I think it would help the reader of Dara Horm's "Eternal Life" is they were both a biblical scholar and a lover of Magical Realism as a writing style. Horn's book basically covers over two thousand years in the life of Rachel, who simply, cannot die. She can be burned to cinders - and was many times - and she will return to life as an 18 year old, ready to begin yet another life as a wife and mother. She thinks she has had seventy or so life times and by , simply wants to die - permanently. H I think it would help the reader of Dara Horm's "Eternal Life" is they were both a biblical scholar and a lover of Magical Realism as a writing style.

How was Rachel blessed with eternal life? Truthfully, I'm a little sketchy on what happened to make her eternal; one of problems with Magical Realism is the author can sort of fudge on rationality. But, her young son lived and Rachel went from lifetime to lifetime, country to country, marrying and outliving even her great, great, great etc grandchildren. She was joined in eternity by Elazar, her lover from her first life who appeared time and again to complicate her life lives. I'm still a bit undecided about how to rate "Eternal Life".

For the right reader, it's five star, but for the wrong one, it's 3 star at best. I'm giving it a four star rating because, while I probably am not the "right" reader and god only knows who is, other than who I've written about in the first sentence , I appreciated the craft and knowledge Dara Horn showed in writing "Eternal Life". Feb 18, miteypen rated it liked it. I had high hopes for this book because it has such an interesting premise: a woman who cannot die and who has already lived for years.

This one came close at times. By the end it seems like the main character, Rachel, has come to terms with, or at least found a way to live, her endless life.

Eternal life | egarosilip.tk

But, seriously, it took her years to get to that point? Or has she just once again started yet another life I had high hopes for this book because it has such an interesting premise: a woman who cannot die and who has already lived for years. Or has she just once again started yet another life with hope because everything is new again? Reading books or seeing movies about immortals is a way to test our own reactions to living life without end.

What would it be to outlive everyone we love? How would we keep our immortality a secret? Would we feel that we had to? The most glaring absence in this and other books about immortals is what it would do to our concept of God. Religions are based on explaining what happens to us after we die. Basically they developed because of our existential angst about mortality. Why does God make us die? These books and movies are at root an attempt to answer these questions.


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But by not considering the spiritual aspects, they usually come up short. Eternal Life, by Dara Horn, was one of the most interesting novels I have read in a long time. I do not normally choose to read books that include time travel, and I did not know this one would. Had I known, I would not have picked it up, but I am glad that I started to read it, and that I was instantly hooked.

It is a quick paced story of Rachel, who was born more than years ago, the daughter of a Jewish scribe, who fell in love with Elezar, the son of a priest, though not a priest in the Eternal Life, by Dara Horn, was one of the most interesting novels I have read in a long time.

It is a quick paced story of Rachel, who was born more than years ago, the daughter of a Jewish scribe, who fell in love with Elezar, the son of a priest, though not a priest in the christian world. I believe he, too, was a Jew. Rachel, soon after, married, and then made a bargain to save her young son when he grew ill. The bargain was that her son could live if she agreed to live forever. Yes forever. Rachel lived so many lives, had so many husbands, so many children and grandchildren, etc. She could not die. Over the course of the book, which is a fairly quick read, the story is told by going back and forth in time so we come to understand questions that arose.

I learned a lot. My minimal knowledge of the bible and Judaism helped me understand things that someone without a background in Judaism might not understand, but I don't think that would effect the joy of reading Eternal Life. Now I need to discover the other novels by Dara Horn! She was unknown me until I read Eternal Life. I really enjoyed this book even though it wasn't quite what I anticipated.

The transitions back and forth through time were seamlessly done, which is no small thing, and the writing was beautiful. I loved the way the author interwove cultural and historical details. My only small quibble was that the ending was not entirely satisfying to me as a reader, at least initially. But after giving it a lot of thought, I realized it was cleverly done and in keeping with the message of the book.

The fault I really enjoyed this book even though it wasn't quite what I anticipated. The fault was not with the ending, but with me and my preference for tidy wrap-ups and happily-ever-afters. Fiction, like life, doesn't always work that way. At first I was put off by the way the story is told - you have to infer and then later chapters reveal the blanks. But by the end I loved it. Tells a big picture story in a small and personal way. I had just read a book by a 20th century American philosopher, William E.

What Happens to Believers When They Die?

Hocking, exploring issues surrounding the role of death in human experience and in understanding the meaning of life and the possibility of a form of survival after death. Upon finishing the book, I saw Dara Horn's new novel "Eternal Life" prominently displayed on the new books shelf of the local library. I thought it would make a fitting Rachel Weeping For Her Children Sometimes reading one book leads directly to another.

I thought it would make a fitting novelistic successor to the philosophy I had just read. I had read and enjoyed Horn's novel "The Guide for the Perplexed" but that alone would not have induced me to read her new book. This book has religious, spiritual themes as befitting its title. The book explores universal themes about the meaning of life and death that are important but difficult to grasp. The book is also highly and specifically within the Jewish tradition. The book ranges over a year time span and is a mix of religion, history, a satire of contemporary life, and utter fancy. The heroine of the book, Rachel, lived in Jerusalem at the time before the destruction of the Second Temple.

When her son is dying, she makes a bargain with God through the high priest. The young son's life will be spared on condition that Rachel agrees to live forever, without death. Rachel's lover, the boy's likely father, Elazar makes a similar bargain. The two live through thousands of years, from place to place, with Elazar pursuing his flame. Both make many marriages over the century and have many children.

Of course the deathless parents outlive and are in a sense detached from their offspring. Much of the book is set in late 20t century America as Rachel owns a gem store. She has a son heavily involved a computer technology of the wackiest kind and a granddaughter who is a physician involved in research which, she thinks, may put a stop to or change the character of death.

God’s Way to Eternal Life

Rachel is weary and disenchanted with her long life of wandering and wants to die. And so the book includes many meditations on the importance of death as a part of life similar to the philosophy book I read. The book also traces Rachel's and Elazar's lives over the centuries. It talks about the destruction of the Temple, the diaspora, the Crusades, the Holocaust and many other indignities inflicted on the Jewish people over the years. Rachel's young son whose life is spared, Yohan ben Zakkai was a great Talmudic scholar heavily involved in the Jews survival during the destruction of the Second Temple.

The book seems to be a parable of the survival of the Jewish people over the centuries as much or more than it is a meditation on death and its importance to life. There are many allusions in the book, some obvious some less so. Rachel of course is a Biblical character, a matriarch, remembered for weeping over her children as Rachel does in this book. There are other stories about Jews living forever that seem to me to form a backdrop for this book.

There is the Christian story of the Wandering Jew doomed due to his unbelief to live and wander until the Second Coming. I think Horn's book she is a scholar of comparative literature plays upon and answers this old legend. I had mixed reactions to the book. The historical sections, particularly the discussion of the Second Temple Era is moving and convincing.

Much of the 20th Century portion of the book is snappy, secular, and in a sense out of place with the seriousness of the theme. But then, the book is intended to show continuity and change over time. It still is disjointed. On the whole, "Eternal Life" is a serious, thoughtful book that wrestles with issues of the nature of life that will interest readers regardless of their religious beliefs, and with issues of Jewish identity and Jewish survival. The book reads easily for all its seriousness of purpose. It is valuable to see modern popular novels that address spiritual questions of the human condition as well as particular issues of most concern to Jewish readers.

Robin Friedman View 2 comments. I'm still sorting out my feelings about this book and I may up the rating in the future. This was a fast and immersive read. The author definitely did her research for the historical aspects of this book and those were my favorite parts of the book.

I would read a book by her set just ancient or late antique Jerusalem in a heartbeat. She made it feel so alive and engaged in discussions of what is important in a religion and how the destruction of the Second Temple affected Jewish comm 3. She made it feel so alive and engaged in discussions of what is important in a religion and how the destruction of the Second Temple affected Jewish communities up until today.

However, the part of the book that took place in the present was not as engaging to me. I guess I just wasn't attached to Rachel's family and the plotline interested me less. I also found the ending of the book to be unsatisfying but I'm a person who struggles with open-ended conclusions to books, and if that's not you, you'l probably really enjoy it. I really liked Rachel's character. She was sympathetic and relateable but also burdened and I thought Horn did a great job balancing those two.

Rachel's love interest which is not the right word AT ALL, but there is no term to describe the relationship she has with this man was also well written. Their relationship was not healthy or admirable, but it was well written and made sense. It was complicated and explored the history and the struggles the two characters had.. So overall, this was an enjoyable read and many aspects of it were fantastic, but I just didn't get drawn in quite enough to give this four or five stars.

This book has an interesting premise.


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When she becomes pregnant by her lover Elazar, who is of the priestly caste and cannot marry her, her parents quickly find her an unwitting husband. But the child, Yochanan, becomes seriously ill early in his childhood. Rachel and Elazar make a fateful bargain: their deaths for their son's life. Yochanan is spared, but Rachel and Elazar are doomed This book has an interesting premise.

Yochanan is spared, but Rachel and Elazar are doomed to live forever. They each have dozens of families and hundreds of children over the centuries, all of whom they outlive. Elazar pursues the ambivalent Rachel through two millenia - until the 21st century dawns, and it appears that technology may offer Rachel a way out of her unwanted eternal life.

This story definitely drew me in. Rachel is an appealling character, and the concept of eternal life is well-handled. But there were some loose threads and some things that didn't make sense, and I felt ambivalent about how the story ended. Like my reviews?